Re: Windmills at Old Wind Temple

From: Robert McArthur (mcarthur@fit.qut.edu.au)
Date: Sat 03 May 1997 - 07:59:01 EEST


> > Brilliant Mistake <idyoung@seanet.com> takes me to task over Orlanthi
> > windmills. Point taken, but I still think that the 16th century is taking
> > things a bit far, except for the Mostali of course (and they'd use
> > underground watermills anyway). All IMO, natch.
>
> I am sorry to disappoint you gentlemen, but the windwill is rather
> older than the 1500s. It was brought to Europe from the Holy Land
> after the First Crussade. The 16th century brought an innovation in
> sail design that increased the lift (thus power) of the sails,
> especially at lower speeds, and an improved auto-steering system.
> Before that, most windmills were turbine-styled, instead of pinwheel
> styled like the classic Dutch windmill. They were also less useful,
> due to lower power and torque.

In one scenario locally, the windmill powered the grain-crushing. This makes
sense in an Orlanthi society. IMHO everyting in society is going to be looked
at from the point of view of a) how can the earth provide it; and b) how can
the wind provide it. We're talking 'masculine' and power to _crush_ the grain
so Orlanth rather than the Earth is called on to work out a solution: convert
wind energy to another form of work.

Reminds me to get off my butt and, amongst other things, keep thinking of all
the fun ways a magical society, and magically able population, does things
differently to the Real World. Whatever Greg says, IMG magic and the gods are
predominant in the physical, and in people's minds (referring to Greg's comment
that there is much less (obvious?) magic in Glorantha than has been (perhaps)
perviously portrayed).

Robert

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