flat horizons

From: Ian Gorlick (igorlick@nortelnetworks.com)
Date: Fri 13 Aug 1999 - 23:46:15 EEST


I know that the flat planet theory is official, but I have never liked it.
It has very serious implications for communications and navigation. The
"haze limited resolution" idea helps, but you don't have to be able to
resolve a signal lamp or a lighthouse to be able to use the information they
are sending. At sea at night, one can see a burning cigarette end over five
miles away, you can send signals 40 miles (beyond the visible horizon) by
bouncing them off clouds. Try imagining how far a powerful light could send
a signal on a flat planet.

If the Lunars were to set a big red beacon on top of Tada's Tumulus, then
nobody could ever get lost in Prax again. Where's the fun in that?

Some people may like this, I don't. So my Glorantha does have a horizon. I'm
not sure yet if it is caused by curving light or a curved surface, I think
this is a major debate among Gloranthan geographers. (There was a lot of fun

discussion about curving light and its implications some years back.) (Even
if Glorantha isn't a sphere, there is no reason why the surface can't be
curved. There might be some esthetic objections, but everyone is allowed to
make their Glorantha fit their esthetics.)

------------------------------


This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.7 : Fri 13 Jun 2003 - 18:32:30 EEST