* **

This is a copy of the rough draft with a rough draft index.

It is a very long document, almost half a meg -- so only download this if you are ready to take the time.

It includes some of my notes and comments and suggestions.

My current information is that this project is 99% dead, but that it is ok to post it to the Internet for comments and suggestions.

Maybe it can be resurrected or completed.





<COMMENT>*** optional page update date</COMMENT>

RQIV Playtest Draft 1.0





Copyright (C) 1992 Oliver Jovanovic, Michael Dawson, Martin Crim, Carl Fink, Ken Rolston and Michael McGloin

Certain sections of this material were previously published

by Chaosium and Greg Stafford, and this should in no way be

construed as a challenge to prior copyrights.

The following set of rules is the first playtest draft for the RQIV rules. They're being sent out to a number of groups for playtesting and comment (which, if you're reading this, I hope you're one of <g>).

We'll be compiling and keeping track of all playtest comments and responses, and hope to produce a number of subsequent drafts that either expand upon the current material or correct any omissions or errors that may crop up in earlier drafts.

We're looking for both general impressions and specific comments on the rules presented below. Problems with a specific rule, unclear rules, omissions, errors, areas that could use expansion, missing rules, etc., are all of interest. Otherwise, use your judgement as to what might be of use.

In terms of feedback, short notes or questions are no problem, and if you send a longer note with any comments you might have every two weeks or so, I should be able to get back to you with at least a partial response. I'm hoping to get a new draft out every month to month and a half.

Depending on your email access, send playtest comments to one of the following addresses:

America Online Gray

CompuServe 73567,1725

GEnie O.JOVANOVIC

Internet jovanovic@cuccfa.ccc.columbia.edu

or

Oliver Jovanovic

680 Fort Washington Avenue

New York, N.Y. 10040

Formatting information

This comes from the original distribution file and I'm including it because I think that completeness is a virtue -- and because you may get a copy of the file or be interested in one.

To properly display this file, use a monospaced font and a display that will give you at least 80 characters on a line, at least for the tables. Otherwise, the rules are currently formatted in the manner of the RQIII Deluxe Set, with sections corresponding to the Players Book, Magic Book, Gamemaster Book, and Creatures Book, in that order. For those of you that may be interested, RQIV should also include much of the material from the Glorantha Book, as it will have a Gloranthan background and setting, not the Fantasy Europe setting of RQIII.

Looking forward to working with you,



Oliver Jovanovic

RQIII -> RQIV CHARACTER CONVERSION

The majority of the changes in RQIV are with respect to mechanics, not names of skills, spells or characteristics, so converting RQIII characters should be relatively painless.

Ideally converting RQIII characters should be basically a transparent operation, with most changes being forward looking and modular (use them only if you want to).

The major changes that will affect most characters are the addition of a agility skill called Maneuver that governs movement in combat, and the addition of a magic skill called Spirit Combat, which governs spirit combat. A section on skill conversion follows this section.

Three skills category modifiers, Agility, Knowledge and Stealth have changed. They should be refigured appropriately, but skills above the level of base skill plus or minus the new modifier that fall into those categories should remain the same, so for the most part the only change that takes place is to the modifier itself.

The Damage Modifier has changed, and if a characters STR and SIZ fall into a new category, that category should be used instead.

Fatigue has been eliminated and replaced by a Fatigue Roll. See Fatigue for how to calculate a character's current Fatigue Roll and status.

A number of new skills have been added. Most characters will be concerned with only two of them: Maneuver and Spirit Combat.

MANEUVER



A RQIII character's Maneuver skill can be calculated by one of two methods. If the character is a foot warrior with skills in the 45% to 90% range, compare him or her to the various levels of foot warrior in the previous experience section, and assign an appropriate level of Maneuver skill.

The other method is to calculate the average of the character's best attack and best defense skill (average of best attack and best parry or Dodge skill, whichever is higher). Then, try to gauge whether the character is primarily a combatant, or primarily a non combatant. A character that is primarily a combatant (Humakti, Orlanthi, Yelmalio, etc.) should start with a Maneuver skill equal to that average.

A character that fights, but is not primarily a combatant, should start with a Maneuver skill equal to three quarters that average. A character that is primarily a noncombatant should start with a Maneuver skill equal to half that average.

SPIRIT COMBAT



A RQIII character's Spirit Combat skill may be above base. Most characters should start with a skill equal to the highest intensity spirit magic spell he or she knows x 8, or 25% (base) plus magic modifier, whichever is higher. This is because the character would have learned from fighting spell spirits in the past, and big spell spirits are tougher than small ones.

A gamemaster may wish to set some character's Spirit Combat skill even higher to reflect numerous fights with spirits in the past. A sorcery user gets base skill, unless he or she has fought many spirits. For a shaman, compare him or her to the various levels of shaman in the previous experience, and assign an appropriate level of Spirit Combat skill, or give the shaman a Spirit Combat skill equal to his or her POW x 5.

Gamemaster's should set Spirit Sense, Spirit Lore, and Spirit Travel skills for converted characters. In most cases, these will be at base skill, however, characters that have had a number of encounters with spirits should have Spirit Sense and possibly Spirit Lore skills above base levels. The GM should consider the character's profession and experience with spirits.

For shamans, compare the character to the various levels of shaman in the previous experience, and assign an appropriate level of skill; or make Spirit Sense equal to the shaman's highest perception skill, Spirit Lore equal to the highest knowledge skill, and Spirit Travel equal the shaman's POW x 5.

A few RQIII spell effects that are not covered in the main rules have changed due to changes in fatigue:

The Divine Magic Invigorate spell totally restores the target's short and long term fatigue.

The Divine Magic Strength of Basmol spell does not allow the target to regain lost fatigue levels by resting while the spell is active. When the target's fatigue class reaches Incapacitated, the target collapses, and the spell ends. The spell will end in 15 minutes, regardless of the target's exertion, at which point the target's short term fatigue class drops to Incapacitated.

RQIV PLAYERS BOOK

Page 13:

DETERMINING CHARACTERISTICS, replace with:

To generate an average human, roll 3d6 for STR, CON, POW and DEX; roll 2d6+6 for INT and SIZ. To generate slightly above average adventurers, we recommend one of the three following methods:

Random Method:

Roll 4d6 and keep the result of the 3 highest die rolls for all characteristics except INT and SIZ. For INT, roll 3d6, keep the result of the 2 highest die rolls and add 6. For SIZ, roll 2d6+6.

Deliberate Method:

Use 80 points to purchase the adventurer's characteristics. Each point of SIZ or INT up to 13 costs 1 point, each point of SIZ or INT above 13 costs 2 points; each point of APP costs point; and each point of STR, CON, POW and DEX costs 1 point. An adventurer purchased in this fashion must have a minimum INT and SIZ of 8 each, and a minimum of 6 for all other characteristics. No characteristic higher than 18 can be purchased by this method.

Combined Method:

Roll 3d6 for STR, CON, POW and DEX; roll 2d6+6 for INT and SIZ. Then use 8 points to purchase higher statistics as with the deliberate method (1 point per characteristic point, 2 points per point of INT or SIZ above 13, point per point of APP). No human characteristic can total more than 18 after purchasing additional points by this method.

My random deliberate method calls for rolling characteristics, allowing players to add several points for "growth" and then modifying the totals so that all characters have the same total points. I think it makes for a better method than the combined method in that it does not encourage the rolling of multiple characters hoping for outrageous luck (despite the munchkin superstition, computers were not invented to allow multiple attempts to roll great characters).

Page 15:

DAMAGE MODIFIER, replace table with:

STR + SIZ Damage Bonus Average STR + SIZ (average bonus)

2-5 -1d6 1 (-3.5)

6-10 -1d4 3 (-2.5)

11-15 -1d2 6 (-1.5)

16-20 0 8

21-25 +1d2 11 (+1.5)

26-30 +1d4 13 (+2.5)

31-35 +1d6 16 (+3.5)

36-40 +2d4 18 (+5.0)

41-45 +2d6 21 (+7.0)

46-50 +2d8 23 (+9.0)

51-55 +3d6 26 (+10.5)

56-60 +2d12 28 (+13.0)

61-65 +4d6 31 (+14.0)

66-70 +3d10 33 (+16.5)

71-80 +5d6 36 (+17.5)

Each +10 add 1d6

[This is an attempt at smoothing out the damage bonus table, particularly at the lower ends. We're still not entirely happy with this, so if you have any better ideas, we'd appreciate hearing them.]

Something I've tried, and am not completely happy with either, is to add on the average damage that the dice indicate, rather than more dice. Thus 46-50 has +9 to damage rather than the +2d8 that +9 reflects.

In addition, 2d12 is a far more random than the normalized 4d6. 3d6+d2 is smoother and more of a normal curve.



Page 19:

FIGURING SKILLS CATEGORY MODIFIER, replace appropriate parts with:

Agility Skills Modifier

DEX, STR = Primary

SIZ = Negative

Knowledge Skills Modifier

INT = Primary

POW = Secondary

Stealth Skills Modifier

DEX = Primary

INT = Secondary

SIZ, POW = Secondary Negative

A Secondary Negative Influence subtracts one percentile from the modifier for every two characteristic points above 10, and adds one percentile to the modifier for every two characteristic points below 10. There is no limit to the maximum modifier for a Secondary Negative Influence. Good.

Pages 21 to 32:

PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE, replace most of with:

The RQIV previous experience system allows a player to allocate a number of skill points towards the purchase of various skills in their character's profession.

This eventually becomes clear, but it should be clearer, sooner.



SKILL POINTS AND OVERALL LEVEL OF EXPERIENCE



The gamemaster should assign a number of skill points for each player to spend, as well as determine the overall level of experience of all the characters. There are five basic levels of experience: Novice, Trained, Average, Expert and Master. The levels of experience determine the age and initial skill level of characters.

NOVICE

Characters are typically 14-16 years old.

0 - 10 skill points (5 recommended).

All skills are at base starting percentages, plus the appropriate skill category modifier and additions from cultural background, if relevant.

Skill points allocated can purchase appropriate skills to the level of Trained, but any skills purchased cost twice the listed amount (since the character is not yet a member of a profession). With the gamemaster's permission, skill points can be used to purchase magic (generally limited to 1 or 2 points of Spirit Magic or Intensity and a single Sorcery spell to the Trained level for a Sorcery using character).

At this point the mechanics (e.g. the amount of %skill bought with a skill point) are not clear. Those mechanics should be clear before the reader gets to this point.

TRAINED

Characters are typically 16-20 years old.

11-24 skill points (16 recommended).

All skills start at the purchased base (generally 30% to 45%) plus the appropriate skill category modifier and additions from cultural background, if any.

AVERAGE

Characters are typically 18-25 years old.

25-50 skill points (32 recommended).

All skills start at the purchased base (generally 45% to 60%) plus the appropriate skill category modifier and additions from cultural background, if any.

EXPERT

Characters are typically 23-35 years old.

51-100 skill points (64 recommended).

All skills start at the purchased base (generally 60% to 75%) plus the appropriate skill category modifier and additions from cultural background, if any.



MASTER

Characters are typically 25-40+ years old.

101+ skill points (132 recommended).

All skills start at the purchased base (generally 75% to 90%) plus the appropriate skill category modifier and additions from cultural background, if any.

CHARACTER GENERATION:



CULTURAL BACKGROUND

A player selects (or randomly determines) his or her character's cultural background, magical background and choice of initial profession. The character's cultural background determines his or her choice of magical background and profession, as well as specific bonuses to some skills.

For example, in a game where Average level characters are being generated, a player chooses to create a Civilized Foot Warrior, with a Spirit/Divine magical background. The gamemaster allocates 16 skill points to each character, but set no other limitations than the overall level of experience (Average).



MAGICAL BACKGROUND

The player then selects (or randomly determines) the magical background of his or her character. Sorcery is normally only available to characters from a civilized background. Additional skill points are spent to purchase magical spells and skills as appropriate for the character's magical background and the overall level of experience set by the gamemaster.

Where a random number appears for the number of spells available, players can randomly roll for the number of spells or select a number of spells within that range, as appropriate for the campaign.

I would prefer for all random charts to also have an alternative fixed number so that a GM may either use random rolled numbers or require fixed choices. Again, trying to keep away from the rolling derby I've seen too often.

The exact spells available to the character will depend on a number of factors, such as the cults and religions a character belongs to, what spirit magic he or she could learn from a shaman, or what kind of training was available for a sorcery using character. The player should work out the exact spell selection appropriate for the character's background in consultation with the gamemaster.

The Average Civilized Foot Warrior in the above example

has a Spirit/Divine magical background. As the gamemaster has

not set any specific limits, the player chooses to purchase

6 points of Spirit Magic and 2 points of Divine Magic. This

costs the character (6 x .25) + (2 x 1) = 3.5 skill points.

Nice example, except that the reader ought already to know this. The example is still a good idea.



BASIC SKILLS

The player should then select (or randomly determine) an initial profession from those available to the character's cultural background.

Skill points are then spent to purchase all the base skills of the character's initial profession up to the overall level of experience set by the gamemaster. The cost to purchase all the basic skills to a particular base level is listed for each profession, to expedite the process.

For example, in the above example, with the overall level of

experience set at Average, the player generating the Civilized

Foot Warrior would use 10.25 skill points to purchase all the

base skills of a Foot Warrior to the Average level. He has now

spent a total of 13.75 skill points.



OPTIONAL SKILLS AND TRAINING

The characters remaining skill points should be spent on the purchase of additional optional skills from his or her profession, on skills outside his or her profession, or on characteristic training (although availability of the latter may be limited).

PURCHASING OPTIONAL SKILLS WITHIN ONE'S PROFESSION

Any optional skills within one's profession can be purchased at the listed point costs to any level up to the level of the character's basic skills in the profession (limited by the overall level of experience set by the gamemaster).

The Civilized Foot Warrior above could purchase any of the

optional skills of his profession at to a level of Average

(or Trained) at the listed costs.

PURCHASING SKILLS OUTSIDE ONE'S PROFESSION

There are two ways to purchase skills outside one's profession.

The first is for the character to buy the skill from another profession at any level up to the overall level of experience set by the gamemaster at twice the listed cost. Skills that are particularly inappropriate for the character's background (a Primitive Hunter learning Craft/Iron, for example) should not be allowed by the gamemaster unless the player can come up with a very good reason their character would have learned the skill. Learning spells or spell skills outside of a character's originally determined magical background is generally not possible.

The second approach is for the character to become a member of the profession he or she wishes to learn the skill from. If a character purchases all the basic skills of another profession the skill point cost is at the listed values (not twice the listed cost), and he or she can purchase optional skills of that profession at normal cost as well. The character can not purchase optional skills in the other profession beyond the level of the basic skills purchased in that profession. In other words, if an Expert Warrior purchases (or already knows) all the basic skills of Hunter to at least an Average level, the skill point cost for the basic Hunter skills is the listed one, and the character can purchase optional Hunter skills up to the Average level at the listed cost as well.

There is no limit (other than skill points) to the number of professions one can join this way inside one's original culture.

Joining a profession outside of a character's original culture (such as a Nomad Hunter becoming a Civilized Missionary) is more difficult, and the gamemaster should not allow this to occur without a very good reason in the character's background. Even if a character has an excellent rationale for entering a profession outside of his or her original culture, the gamemaster might impose a penalty, such as making some or all of the new profession's skills cost twice the listed amounts.

The Civilized Foot Warrior above could purchase skills from other

professions to a level of Average (or Trained) at double the listed costs, or could actually purchase all the base skills of

another profession and become a member of that profession as well

at the Trained or Average level, in which case the skills of that

profession would be purchased at the listed costs. We'll assume

he spends his remaining 2.25 points to purchase a few skills to

the Trained level that interest him.



CHARACTERISTIC INCREASES

With the gamemaster's permission, some skill points can be spent to purchase characteristic increases, representing time spent improving characteristics instead of skills. Only optional points left over after the purchase of cultural background, basic professional skills and magic can be spent in this manner.

Any characteristic but INT can be increased in this manner, to the normal limits of characteristic increase (see section on Characteristic Maxima above). The exact characteristics that can be increased in this manner depend on the character's background.

POW can only be increased by characters that have used spells offensively (Warriors, Thieves, Merchants, Apprentice Sorcerers, Nobles, Hunters, Sailors or Assistant Shamen that know an offensive spell) fought spirits (Assistant Shamen, Apprentice Sorcerer), or are initiates of a cult.

DEX can be increased by Warriors, Players, Thieves, Hunters, Sailors, some Crafters and some initiates (depending on the cult).

STR and CON can be increased by Warriors, Farmers, Sailors, Fishers, some Crafters and some initiates.

APP can be increased by Players, Nobles, Missionaries, and some initiates.

SIZ can be increased by anyone that isn't on a subsistence level diet, typically the better off members of Civilized or Barbarian cultures.

INT can be increased by those professions that emphasis logic and rhetoric.

To increase a characteristic, the player spends skill points equal to one fourth the characteristic's current value, which results in the characteristic increasing by a point (or 1d3-1 points). As a guideline, Novice characters should generally not be allowed to use this option, Trained characters should generally be limited to using this option once, Average characters twice, Expert characters four times, and Master characters up to eight times. Note that although excellent characteristics can be obtained in this manner, a character's skills may suffer as a result.

As our Civilized Foot Warrior has spent all of his skill points,

he has none left to purchase characteristics. If the gamemaster

allowed it, and he had sufficient skill points left to do so,

he could have increased two characteristics (or one characteristic

twice).

OPTIONS

The character generation system described above is easily modified to suit the needs of the gamemaster and players.

If characters have to be generated quickly (this method is particularly suitable to NPCs), simply select the overall level of experience and profession of the character, then simply use all the base skills and as many optional skills as desired (plus skill category modifier and cultural bonuses, if any).

The tables are particularly useful in giving the gamemaster and players a rough idea as to how skilled the average town guard or typical master thief is, although they are only rough guidelines - it is always possible to run into a Master at Arms that is not quite as good as his name suggests or a naturally skillful novice thief.

This is a good place to toss in some template characters for NPCs and quick character generation. Perhaps each major profession could have a "sample" in a side bar that shows a character archetype or template?" (The later tables come close enough for an intelligent person to create their own, but the added ease would be a very good thing.

The age ranges for each level are also suggested values. They can be randomly determined, or a number from that range selected. Again they are only guideline, and the gamemaster or players with the gamemaster's approval can freely select ages from outside the recommended ranges.

The system is fairly flexible, and a gamemasters can alter the mechanics to suit his or her game. For example, if the gamemaster would like to specialize characters a bit, giving each character one or two skills he or she is particularly good at, one option is to set a base overall level of experience, then allow each character to purchase one or two skills at one level above the base (to Average if the overall base level of experience is Trained), perhaps at twice the listed cost if the skill is part of their initial profession, four times the listed cost if the skill is outside their initial profession.

A gamemaster can assign extra skill points solely for the purchase of certain skills or characteristic training, etc.



PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE TABLES

CULTURAL BACKGROUND TABLE

Roll or select cultural background.

Roll (1d8) Cultural Background

1 Primitive

2,3 Nomad*

4,5,6 Barbarian

7,8 Civilized

*A good addition. Past Civilized you may want to add Technical. Technical societies are really interesting -- the 1860s British were in a Technical Society.

CIVILIZED BARBARIAN

Civilized Etiquette +20%

Fast Talk +5% Survival (Terrain) +10%

Bargain +5% Barbarian Etiquette +20%

Scout (Terrain) +10% Scout (Terrain) +20%

Lore (Area) +20% Lore (Area) +20%

Magic: Magic:

Sorcery (25%) or Divine/Spirit (75%) or

Divine/Spirit (75%) Spirit (25%)

Professions: Professions:

Foot Warrior Foot Warrior

Mounted Warrior Mounted Warrior

Player Player

Thief Noble

Merchant Merchant

Noble Assistant/Shaman

Apprentice/Sorcerer Healer

Healer Hunter

Scholar Crafter

Official Herder

Missionary Fisher

Sailor Farmer

Crafter

Farmer

Herder

Fisher

NOMAD PRIMITIVE

Ride or March +20%

Survival (Terrain) +20% Survival (Terrain) +20%

Nomad Etiquette +20% Primitive Etiquette +20%

Scout (Terrain) +20% Scout (Terrain) +20%

Lore (Range) +20% Lore (Area) +20%

Magic: Magic:

Divine/Spirit (50%) or Divine/Spirit (25%)

Spirit (50%) or Spirit (75%)

Professions: Professions:

Foot Warrior Hunter

Mounted Warrior Assistant/Shaman

Noble Fisher

Assistant/Shaman

Hunter

Crafter

Herder



MAGICAL BACKGROUND TABLE

Roll or select from cultural background.

SORCERY

Sorcery spells and Intensity skill only.

Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Intensity 30% 1 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8

Trained spells 1-3 1-3 1-6 1-6

Average spells 1-3 1-3 1-6

Expert spells 1-3 1-3

Master spells 1-3

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Spell 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Skill point cost for sorcery spells is per spell.

SPIRIT/DIVINE MAGIC

Will typically know both some spirit magic and some divine magic,

at the levels listed below.

Trained Average Expert Master

Spirit Magic 1d3 points 2d3 points 3d3 points INT points

Divine Magic 1d2-1 points 1d3-1 points 1d6 points 2d6 points

Skill point cost for Spirit Magic is 1/4 skill point per point of spell.

Skill point cost for Divine Magic is 1 skill points per point of spell (typically one use).

The number of uses needs to be defined rather than "typified." You'll get bitter arguments between players and GMs. Give a few examples (e.g. Rune Priests get multiuse, initiates get one use, or Masters get multiuse, Expert and below one use -- or, pay 1 skill point get single use, 3 skill points get the spell in multiuse form.



SPIRIT MAGIC

Spirit magic only.

Trained Average Expert Master

1d6 points 3d3 points 4d3 points INT points

Skill point cost for Spirit Magic is 1/4 skill point per point of spell.

SKILL TABLES

The previous experience skill tables are fairly self explanatory. The tables are organized by profession, with the base skill level and corresponding skill point cost for the basic skills of the profession, listed by overall experience level (Trained, Average, Expert and Master). The total skill point cost for all the basic skills of the profession

is listed below each set of basic skills.

Optional skills follow, in some cases listed in a cluster of skills appropriate for a certain specialization in each profession. A player can freely select from any of these specializations or any of the other optional skills, the specializations are listed separately as a source of ideas that one can use to focus a character with. They are not at all mutually exclusive.

For instance, an Expert Merchant that specializes as a Trader will likely have a base Evaluate of 75%. He or she will almost certainly know Bargain as well (from the Merchant specialization), but might choose to learn Bargain to only 60% instead.

SKILL CATEGORIES

Most of the skills listed in the previous experience tables are specific skills. However, some of the skills listed are actually categories of skills. These categories include Primary Attack, Primary Defense, Secondary Attack, Secondary Defense, Tertiary Attack, Lores, Crafts, Play, Speak Language, Read Language and Sorcery Spells.

When a player selects one of these categories, a single specific skill from the category should be selected. The exact specific skills available are subject to the gamemaster's approval, as they should be appropriate to the character's cultural background and upbringing. Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Attacks should be selected from culturally appropriate weapon or unarmed attack skill.

Primary and Secondary Defenses should be selected from a culturally appropriate weapon or unarmed parry skill, or possibly Dodge. A heavy infantryman is unlikely to have learned to Dodge as even a Secondary Defense, whereas a slinger or peltast might have Dodge as a Primary Defense (but see below for Hard skill cost).

A member of a primitive culture is unlikely to learn World Lore or Armory Lore, while a nomad will be hard pressed to learn Craft/Iron. A scholar will have access to many more lores than a player or sailor, who would normally learn lores specific to their professions, or lores they could have picked up in their travels.

You will note that I break up large blocks of text into smaller paragraphs. Giant paragraphs are hard on younger readers.



EASY, MEDIUM AND HARD SKILLS

Note that in the case of specific skills, the skill difficulty (Easy, Medium or Hard) has already been taken into account in the listed skill point cost. However, in the case of the skill categories (Attack, Defense, Lores, Crafts, Play, Languages, Sorcery Spells), the difficulty of the specific skill selected from the category can vary. The listed skill point costs for skill categories assume that the skill is a Medium difficulty

skill (see SKILLS for more details).

If the specific skill selected is actually an Easy skill (i.e., Dagger Attack for a Secondary Attack), halve the listed skill point cost. If the specific skill listed is actually a Hard skill (i.e., Dodge for a Secondary Defense), double the listed skill point cost.

BASIC AND OPTIONAL SKILLS TABLE



FOOT WARRIOR Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Primary Defense 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Tertiary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Maneuver 30% - 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8

First Aid 15% - 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1

Scan 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

TOTAL 4 10.25 20.5 41

>Soldier

Battle 15% - 30% 1/4 60% 1 75% 2

March 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2

Military Etiquette 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2

>Guard

Search 45% 1 60% 1 75% 4 90% 8

Listen 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

>Scout

Scout (Terrain) 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2

Track 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Sneak 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Hide 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2

Conceal 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

>Sergeant

Intimidate 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Instruct 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

>Officer

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Administrate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

>Optional

Run 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2

Survival(Terrain) 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2

PLAYER Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Etiquette (Area) 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2

TOTAL 1.3 3.5 7 14

>Rogue

Hide 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Sneak 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Climb 45% - 60% 75% 2 90% 4

Sleight 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

>Storyteller

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Human Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Speak Lang 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Converse 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

>Musician

Play Instrument 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Sing 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

>Tumbler

Acrobatics 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Jump 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Breakfall 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Balance 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

>Optional

Dance 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Fast Talk 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Run 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Act 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Instruct 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Etiquettes 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Lores 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Mimic 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4



MERCHANT Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Etiquette (Area) 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Human Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

TOTAL 2.5 6 12 24

>Merchant

Bargain 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

>Trader

Evaluate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

>Herald

Memorize 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

>Optional

Fast Talk 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Debate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Speak Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Read Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Instruct 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Etiquettes 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Lores 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Ride 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Scout (Area) 30% - 45% 60% 2 75% 4



APPRENTICE/SORCERER Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Primary Defense 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1

Read Own Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

TOTAL 2 3 7 14

>Optional

Ceremony 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Enchant 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Summon 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Sorcery Skills 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Sorcery Spells 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Lores 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Speak Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Read Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Instruct 45% 1 60% 1 75% 4

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Sing 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Craft 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Devise 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Ok, another difference between this method and my favorite method is that I prefer to generate skills at approximately the levels given -- but using the skill modifiers more. The method you have picked tends to downplay characteristics. Good in some ways, but it makes the bonuses (or the inverse) less meaningful. Since I force an overall balance in my character generation, I don't end up balancing characters at this stage.

OFFICIAL Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1 Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1

Read Own Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Administrate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Debate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

TOTAL 3 7 15 30

>Optional

Human Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Speak Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Read Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Bribe 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Fast Talk 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Etiquettes 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Intrigue 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Interrogate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Bargain 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Ride 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Intimidate 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

HUNTER Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Primary Defense 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1

Hide 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Sneak 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Track 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Craft/Butchery 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Scan 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Animal Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Scout (Terrain) 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Survival (Terrain) 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Listen 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

TOTAL 8.5 16.5 33.5 67

>Optional

Conceal 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Run 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Set Trap 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Search 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Plant Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

First Aid 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Throw 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Climb 45% - 60% 75% 2 90% 4

Jump 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

March 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Ride 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Mimic 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Maneuver 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8



HEALER Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack> 30% 45% 1 60% 2 Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Secondary Attack> 30% 45% 1

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2

First Aid 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

TOTAL 1 3 6.5 13

>Optional

Plant Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Treat Disease 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Treat Poison 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Human Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Animal Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Mineral Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Sing 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Instruct 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

CRAFTER/GUILDSMAN Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Primary Defense 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1

Primary Craft 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Secondary Craft 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

TOTAL 2.5 4 9 18

>Optional

Evaluate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Bargain 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Devise 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Craft 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Conceal 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Instruct 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Etiquette (Guild) 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

SAILOR Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Secondary Attack 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Defense 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Boat 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

TOTAL 2.5 4 8 16

>Optional

Sail 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Swim 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Climb 45% - 60% 75% 2 90% 4

Craft Rope 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Craft Wood 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Shiphandling 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Sing 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Balance 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Lores 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8 Etiquettes 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Devise 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Scan 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Throw 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Ceremony 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8



MOUNTED WARRIOR Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Primary Defense 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Tertiary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Ride 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Mount Lore 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

First Aid 15% - 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1

Scan 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

TOTAL 5.5 11.25 22.5 45

>Soldier

Battle 15% - 30% 1/4 60% 1 75% 2

Military Etiquette 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2

>Outrider

Scout (Terrain) 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Track 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Conceal 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Hide 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2

>Sergeant

Intimidate 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Instruct 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

>Officer

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Administrate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

>Optional

Survival(Terrain) 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2



THIEF Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Etiquette (Street) 30% 1/4 45% 60% 1 75% 2

Scout (Urban) 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Scan 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Search 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

TOTAL 3.25 7.5 15 30

>Fence

Bargain 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16 Evaluate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

>Second Story Man

Climb 45% - 60% 75% 2 90% 4

Jump 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

>Beggar

Beg 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

>Optional

Hide 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Sneak 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Shadow 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Fast Talk 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Pick Lock 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Pickpocket 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Set Trap 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Disarm Trap 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Devise 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Bribe 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Act 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Instruct 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Thief Lores 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Etiquettes 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Listen 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

SCHOLAR Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Primary Defense 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1

Speak Own Language 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Read Own Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

TOTAL 2.5 4 9 18

>Optional

Lores 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Evaluate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Crafts 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Instruct 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Speak Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Read Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Etiquettes 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Debate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Devise 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

GENTRY/NOBLE Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Etiquette (Court) 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4 Speak Own Language 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Read Own Language 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

TOTAL 2.5 6 12 24

>Optional

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Evaluate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Lores 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Etiquettes 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Administrate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Bribe 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Ride 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Fast Talk 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Debate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Play 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Sing 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Intrigue 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Speak Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Read Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

MISSIONARY Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1

Ceremony 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Debate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Human Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Speak Own Language 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Read Own Language 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

TOTAL 5.5 12 25 50

>Optional

Fast Talk 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Cult Lores 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Cult Skills 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Etiquettes 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Summon 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Enchant 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Ride 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

I am also in favor of putting all the skills, vocations, etc. in alphabetical order.



HERDER Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 45% 1 75% 4

Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 75% 4

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1

Scan 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Search 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 Track 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Animal Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Craft/Butchery 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Listen 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

TOTAL 3.5 8 17 38

>Optional

First Aid 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Plant Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Sing 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Climb 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Jump 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Crafts 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8



ASSISTANT/SHAMAN Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Primary Defense 30% 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1

Spirit Combat 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Spirit Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Spirit Sense 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Spirit Travel 30% 1 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8

Summon 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Ceremony 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

TOTAL 10 19 39 78

>Optional

Etiquette (Culture) 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Enchant 45% 2 60% 4 75% 8 90% 16

Sing 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

First Aid 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Treat Disease 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Lores 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Orate 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Instruct 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4



FARMER Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 45% 1 75% 4

Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 75% 4

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1

Plant Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Mineral Lore 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

TOTAL 2 5 11 26

>Optional

Animal Lore 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

First Aid 30% 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

Crafts 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Scan 30% - 45% 60% 1 75% 2

Search 30% - 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4

FISHER Trained Average Expert Master

Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts. Base Pts.

Primary Attack 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Primary Defense 30% 45% 1 60% 2

Secondary Attack 30% 45% 1

Secondary Defense 30% 45% 1

Boat 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

TOTAL 0.5 2 5 10

>Optional

Sail 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Swim 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Climb 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Craft Rope 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Craft Wood 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Fisher Lores 45% 1 60% 2 75% 4 90% 8

Scan 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Sing 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4

Balance 45% 60% 1 75% 2 90% 4



Page 34:

SKILL VERSUS SKILL, add:

Other options in certain circumstances include subtracting half the 'defending' skill percentiles, or matching the degree of success, such as a normal success defeating a failure, a special success defeating a normal success, and a critical defeating a special success.



Page 37:

SKILL EXPERIENCE ROLLS, replace with

OPTION 1:

Players keep track of when their characters use their skills, and once a skill has been used (fumbles do not count), the player checks the skill on the character sheet.

At the end of each session, the gamemaster allows each player to make a certain number of experience rolls for their character, which must be made from amongst the skills previously checked.

Players can use a single experience roll to attempt to increase a single Medium skill or two Easy skills. Two experience rolls must be used to attempt to increase a Hard skill, four to attempt to increase a Very Hard skill.

Generally each party member should receive the same number of experience rolls. The number of experience rolls handed out by the gamemaster should reflect the length of time that passed in the session, how active the characters were, and the difficulty of the session.

As a rough guideline, for characters with skills averaging in the 50% range, we recommend assigning one experience roll for a session lasting a full week's game time with light adventuring activity throughout, three experience rolls for a session of a full week's game time that saw moderate adventuring activity occur throughout the week, and five experience rolls for a session of a full week's game time that saw a great deal of adventuring activity throughout the week. Time spent training, researching, or taking care of assorted duties should not be counted as adventuring activity.

For shorter periods of game time, assign fewer rolls or wait until more game time has passed to assign rolls. For longer periods of game time, assign more rolls. For very long sessions (several weeks of game time with several active adventures occurring) hand out two or more sets of experience rolls (this allows characters to take two or more experience rolls in skills they're particularly interested in).

For characters of higher or lower levels of average skill, adjust the number of skill rolls or the time required to make the skill rolls accordingly. Characters with skills in the 25% range should get twice the number of rolls suggested after a full week of active adventuring, characters with skills in the 100% range should get the number of skill rolls suggested above after two full weeks of active adventuring, etc.

If using this method, experience rolls handed out at the end of one session can be saved for use at the end of another session if characters have insufficient experience rolls available to increase a Hard or Very Hard skill, or have only a single Easy skill checked (in which case half a roll could be saved, good only for attempting to increase a single Easy skill).

Note that on occasion a gamemaster using this option might wish to specify a skill or skills in which an experience roll should be made. This can be in addition to, or instead of one or more of the regular experience rolls granted. For example, if the characters spent a week doing almost nothing but riding, with a brief adventure along the route, the gamemaster might assign all the characters a Ride experience roll and another experience roll to use as they chose from any of their character's checked skills. Either of the two methods for determining skill gain can be used with this approach.

OPTION 2:

The gamemaster keeps track of how much a character uses any given skill, and if the skill has been used in stress situations over a reasonable period of time, the gamemaster assigns an experience check for the skill. When using this method, players wait to check skills until told to do so by the gamemaster, and generally make experience rolls for a skill immediately after the check has been assigned, which would typically be at the end of a session.

A rough guideline to gamemasters for what a reasonable period of time is to keep an eye on the amount of time it would have taken to qualify for an experience roll through researching a skill. Although learning by experience is generally more effective than research, it should not take less than 1/10 the time to needed to qualify the skill for an experience roll through research, otherwise gains from experience will greatly outstrip those from training and research.

The actual experience rolls can be made once the checks are assigned (generally at the end of the session), or prior to the start of the next session of the game.

Here is where I use player points. I also make the experience gains automatic. As a simple alternative, Option 3.1, it may not be a bad thing to give the players x%s to distribute rather than x rolls to make. A Master level skill is already extremely hard to make a successful roll on. 6%tiles to invest means six skills go up by 1% each. Trained could be allowed to invest up to 4% in any skill down to Master skills improve a maximum of 1% at a time.

A limited option here would encourage GMs who have worries about rapid character growth, while not interfering with those who prefer the more standard methods discussed below.

Page 37:

INCREASING SKILLS BY EXPERIENCE, replace with:



A player that succeeds in an experience roll can immediately add either

1d6 percentiles (3.5) to the skill, or if the player does not feel lucky,

he or she can choose to add 1d2+2 (3.5) percentiles to the relevant skill.

Page 37:

SKILL TRAINING AND RESEARCH, replace most of with:

Length of time for one training or research session:

Easy - Skill %/2.5 in hours

Medium - Skill % in hours

Hard - Skill % x 2 in hours

A successful training session results in a gain of 1d6% (or 1d2+2%) in the skill. A research session will result in a gain of 1d6% (or 1d2+2%) in the skill if a successful experience roll is made.

Note that with the gamemaster's permission, the previous experience tables can be used to quickly provide an estimate of training gains as well. Each skill point is roughly equal to 100 hours training time, so a character that spent 100 hours could use 1 skill point to increase a skill that fell into a listed range. The training times for research sessions as calculated above are more accurate, however.

For a training session to succeed, the teacher must roll under his or her Instruct skill. If the Instruct roll fails, the training session counts as a research session. A fumbled Instruct roll results in the loss of 1d6% from the training session. A special Instruct roll results in a gain of at least 4% (reroll results below 4%) from the training session, and a critical Instruct roll results in a gain of 6% from the training session. A teacher may not teach someone in a skill past their level of skill, level of Instruct skill notwithstanding.

Training above 75% in experience checkable skills, or above 100% in non-experience checkable skills, assuming competent instruction, requires a successful experience roll to gain in skill. A missed instruction roll means that half the time spent training was wasted, and must be made up through further training or research before the character becomes eligible for an experience roll.

Research above 75% in experience checkable skills, or above 100% in non-experience checkable skills, takes twice the normal length of time to make the character eligible for an experience roll to gain in skill.

For a skill with a base of 0%, an initial training session of 25 hours for an Easy skill, 50 hours for a Medium skill, or 100 hours for a Hard skill will yield a starting percentage of 1d6% (or 1d2+2%) plus skill category bonus. If the skill percentage is still 0% or less, a further training session (of 25, 50 or 100 hours) will add another 1d6% (or 1d2+2%) to the skill, until the skill percentage has reached at least 1%, at which time the basics of the skill have finally been imparted, and training (or research) can now proceed at the normal rates.



Page 39:

CHARACTERISTIC INCREASE, replace with:



Two factors determine the limit to which a characteristic can be increased: species maximum and the original characteristic score generated. Species maximum is determined by adding the minimum possible roll to the maximum possible roll for the characteristic of an average member of a species.

Why? RQ uses mostly linear characteristics. Thus a STR of 22 is less than 5% stronger than a STR of 21. An INT of 24 is not even the same as an IQ of 210 (since the IQ base is 100 and is curved and the INT base is 13 and linear). I'm not sure I see the need for species maximums, etc.

For humans, with most characteristics based on a 3d6 roll, species maximum for most characteristics would be 3 + 18 = 21.

The theoretical human maximum for INT is 24, but this characteristic is difficult, if not impossible, to raise above its original rolled values without the use of magic.

A normal human can increase SIZ through training or research (by eating and bulking up), but SIZ increased in a non-magical manner has no effect on SIZ SR, which is based only on original rolled SIZ or SIZ increased by magical means. Extra SIZ gained by training and research will only affect skill modifiers, damage bonus and HP, and every two points of SIZ gained by research or training cause the loss of one point of CON, as excess weight gain is unhealthy.

The original characteristic generated is a further limit to characteristic increase. A character cannot increase his or her STR or CON through training or research higher than the highest original rolled value of STR, CON or SIZ.

A character cannot increase his or her SIZ, DEX or APP through research or training past 1.5 times the original rolled characteristic, or past the species maximum for the characteristic, whichever is lower. Increases in POW are limited to the species maximum.

A much more stringent limit than species maximum is the 1.5 limit.

Some rare forms of magic can cause a permanent increase in a characteristic, beyond the normal limits to training or research imposed by the original rolled values of the characteristic. The limit to such an increase is still the species maximum for the characteristic, with the exception of some very rare, powerful and exotic magics.



Page 39:

PROCEDURE FOR INCREASE THROUGH TRAINING, replace with:

A character can train to increase a characteristic. The availability of characteristic training is often rare, so characters may have to resort to research instead. If an instructor can be found, after a training period of current characteristic x 25 in hours and a successful Instruct roll on the trainers part, the character adds 1d3-1, or 1 point, to the current value of the characteristic.

A critical Instruct roll adds 2 points to the current value of the characteristic. A failed Instruct roll forces the character to succeed in a characteristic increase research roll (see below), and a fumbled Instruct roll causes the character to subtract a point from the current value of the characteristic.

Page 39:

PROCEDURE FOR INCREASE BY RESEARCH, replace with:

After a research period of current characteristic x 25 in hours, the character must make a characteristic increase research roll. To succeed in a characteristic increase research roll, the character must roll equal to or less than (species maximum for characteristic minus current value of characteristic) x 5 on percentile dice. If the roll is successful, add 1d3-1, or 1 point, to the current value of the characteristic. If the roll fails, make no change to the characteristic. A character that has increased a characteristic in this manner becomes qualified to train others.

Page 39:

TIME AND MOVEMENT, see Fatigue and Encumbrance for movement rules.

Page 41:

HUMANOID HIT POINTS PER LOCATION TABLE, replace with:

Total Hit Points

Location 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Right Leg 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7

Left Leg 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7

Abdomen 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7

Chest 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 9

Right Arm 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 6 Left Arm 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 6

Head 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7

Page 41:

RESULTS OF DAMAGE, replace with:

A character will fall unconscious if his or her hit points fall to zero or a negative number. On a roll of CON x 1, the character can make a heroic effort and remain conscious. The character must roll at the beginning of each subsequent melee round in which he or she tries to stay conscious, before making a statement of intent for the character. If a roll fails, the character falls unconscious and cannot make any further attempts at a heroic effort to remain conscious. A character cannot make a CON roll to remain conscious (a heroic effort) and a CON roll to stop loss of HP from bleeding in the same melee round.

A character dies when his or her wounds and lost HP from bleeding total twice his or her HP. Put another way, the character dies when his or her negative HP total equals his or her HP. Death occurs at the instant that damage reaches that point.

For example, an adventurer with 12 total HP reduced to -1 total HP

will fall unconscious (unless the player chooses to

attempt a heroic effort and rolls CON x 1 or less on 1d100).

That character will die upon reaching -12 total HP.

Damage Equal to or Greater Than Hit Points in a Location:

Leg: The character cannot use the leg. He or she will fall and cannot do anything else for the rest of that melee round. The character may fight from the ground in later melee rounds.

Abdomen: The character cannot use either leg. He or she will fall, and cannot do anything else for the rest of that melee round. The character may fight from the ground in later melee rounds. Also, the character loses 1 HP in bleeding damage from total hit points at the end of this and every later melee round. A CON x 5 roll avoids the bleeding damage that round (see below).

Chest: The character falls, too hurt to fight. He or she can crawl at 1/3 the character's normal speed. The character can use First Aid or Healing spells to heal his or her chest. The character will lose 1 HP in bleeding damage from total hit points at the end of this and every later melee round. A CON x 5 roll avoids the bleeding damage that round (see below).

Arm: The character cannot use the arm. He or she drops any item held in the hand, unless the item is attached to the arm. The character can stand and try to fight with whatever limbs are left.

Head: The character is rendered unconscious and falls down. He or she will lose 1 HP in bleeding damage from total hit points at the end of this and every later melee round. A CON x 5 roll avoids the bleeding damage that round (see below).

Damage Equals or Exceeds Double Location Hit Points:

The character is in shock. The character's fatigue class automatically drops by one. The lost fatigue class can be recovered normally.

If the location so damaged was a limb, the character can only try to heal him or herself by applying First Aid or a healing spell and make CON rolls to attempt a heroic effort or prevent bleeding damage. If another location was so damaged, the character can do nothing but make CON rolls to prevent bleeding damage until the location gets healed to the point that the damage no longer equals or exceeds double the location's HP.

Limbs: A limb will not take more than twice the HP in the location, if the damage comes from a normal hand to hand, missile, or natural weapon. Any excess damage is lost. Damage from high velocity weapons such as modern bullets, or a massive impact from a dropped boulder or a fall, will do full damage to the limb.

A limb is maimed if it takes damage equal to or greater than twice the HP of the location. A character cannot use a maimed limb at all. The effect is the same as if the limb took damage equal to or greater than the HP in the location (see above). The character can normally do nothing but use First Aid or Healing spells to heal the maimed limb. In addition, the character loses 1 HP from total HP at the end of this and every later melee round from bleeding. A CON x 5 roll avoids the bleeding damage that round (see below).

Abdomen: A character becomes unconscious and falls if the abdomen takes damage equal to or greater than twice its HP. If not healed, the character will stay unconscious for at least a turn. He or she will lose 2 HP in bleeding damage from total hit points at the end of this and every later melee round. A CON x 3 roll avoids the bleeding damage that round (see below).

Chest: A character becomes unconscious and falls if the chest takes damage equal to or greater than twice its HP. He or she will lose 2 HP in bleeding damage from total hit points at the end of this and every later melee round. The character stays unconscious for at least a turn. The bleeding only stops upon a successful Healing spell or a special success in First Aid.

Head: A character becomes unconscious if the head takes damage equal to or greater than twice its HP. He or she will lose 3 HP in bleeding damage from total hit points at the end of this and every later melee round. The character stays unconscious for at least a turn. The bleeding only stops upon a successful Healing spell or a critical success in First Aid.

Heroic Effort:

A character who takes damage greater than or equal to location HP, but less than twice the HP, can try to make a heroic effort when first injured. If the character makes a CON x 1 roll, he or she can make a heroic effort to continue acting normally with the injured location. (If the head, the character fights instinctively, functioning normally, but later unable to remember what he or she did.) If the first roll fails, the normal effect for the damage occurs. A character who is conscious at the start of a melee round can attempt a heroic effort by rolling CONx1 at the start of the melee round (before the player makes a statement of intent). If the roll succeeds, they can act normally that round. Otherwise, the normal effect occurs.

A character who takes damage equal to or greater than twice the HP in a limb location can make a limited attempt at a heroic effort. If the character makes a CON x 1 roll, he or she may act normally (except for the maimed limb). That is, the character can cast spells, attack, and defend, but cannot use the maimed limb.

Bleeding Damage:

A character can make a CON roll to avoid bleeding in some situations. A character can roll if he or she took damage in the head, chest or abdomen equal to or greater than location HP, but less than twice the location HP, or if he or she took damage in a limb equal to or greater than twice the location HP. A character cannot both roll to be heroic and roll to avoid bleeding in the same melee round.

If the roll to avoid bleeding is less than or equal to CON x 1, the bleeding stops from that wound permanently. If the roll is above CON x 1 but less than or equal to CON x 5, no bleeding damage is taken that melee round. If the roll is greater than CON x 5, bleeding damage occurs normally.

A character hit in the abdomen for damage equal to or greater than twice the location HP can make a CON x 3 roll at the end of every melee round to avoid bleeding damage in that round, and a roll that is also below CONx1 will stop the bleeding permanently.

****

Special effects of weapons on bleeding damage:

Cutting weapons: At the gamemaster's option, bleeding damage caused by sufficiently sharp cutting weapons bleeds for one extra HP of bleeding damage per melee round. Many cutting melee weapons may not have enough of an edge to cause such an effect to take place. Those that do may well be capable of severing a limb or body part should they do enough damage (see Severing below). Such a cutting weapon hitting a limb for damage equal to but less than double the location hit points will cause 1 hit point in bleeding damage to total hit points at the end of that and every later melee round, with the normal CON roll to prevent bleeding damage applying.

Impaling weapons: Impaling weapons do normal amounts of bleeding damage except on an Impale (Special) where the impaling weapon is not removed. A wound inflicted by an impaling weapon that is not removed will not begin to bleed until the weapon is removed.

Heavy crushing weapons: Heavy crushing weapons, such as maces and mauls will inflict normal amounts of bleeding damage, though most of the damage will be the result of internal bleeding.

Soft or light crushing weapons: Short term damage from soft or light blunt weapons does not count towards bleeding damage. Only the normal damage from such weapons can cause bleeding damage (as for heavy crushing weapons). Generally half the damage from weapons such as fists, kicks, grappling, saps, sticks, clubs, staffs, and attacks meant to subdue is normal damage, the remainder short term damage (see Natural Healing for more details).

First Aid can stop bleeding damage. The character performing First Aid must take 1 melee round (2 Melee Actions) to bind the wounds. A simple success stops bleeding damage from a single location except a chest or head hit for twice the location HP or more. A chest hit for double HP or more needs a special roll to stop the bleeding, and a head needs a critical.

For game purposes, all wounds bleed at the same time, at the end of SR 10 in the Melee Phase. If not attempting a heroic effort that melee round, the CON roll to prevent or stop bleeding should be made separately for each bleeding wound a character has incurred. Each wound can inflict additional damage, so a character with a severed arm and a severed leg will lose 2 HP at the end of each melee round unless the CON rolls succeed.



Maiming:

A hit location is maimed if it takes damage equal to or greater than double the location's HP. First Aid cannot restore lost HP to the location, even if it stops the bleeding. Only Healing spells can restore lost hit points to a maimed location. Unless a healing spell restores the location to positive HP within 10 melee rounds of the maiming, the location is permanently maimed, and will remain useless even though its hit points can be restored. To regain full use of a permanently maimed location requires the use of a regenerative spell, such as Regrow Limb or Regenerate.

Severing:

At the gamemaster's option, a cutting or shearing attack that maims a location can actually cut off the location struck. Weapons that are sharp enough or can do enough damage to actually sever a head or limb, not to mention cut someone in half, are quite rare. First Aid can stop the bleeding of a severed limb, but cannot restore HP or stop the bleeding of any severed location other than a limb. A Healing spell can stop the bleeding from any severed body part.

To actually reattach a severed body part, one must first find it. The person doing the healing must make a First Aid roll, taking 1 melee round, to line it up correctly for Healing spell. The First Aid roll must succeed for any subsequent Healing spells to be able to rejoin the body part. Healing spells can only be used to reattach the body part within 10 melee rounds of the amputation, otherwise the severed part cannot be rejoined.

If Healing spells are not used bring the rejoined part to positive HP within 10 melee rounds of the amputation, the location remains useless, even if its HP are later restored. To regain the use of a useless location takes a powerful regenerative spell, such as Regrow Limb or Regenerate.



Page 43:

NATURAL HEALING, Add:

Half the damage inflicted by soft or light blunt weapons is short term damage, with every second point of damage acting as normal damage. This includes damage from fists, grappling, kicks, clubs, sticks, staffs, saps and so on, from attacks meant to subdue (flat of the blade, a carefully wielded mace, etc.), and from falls on earth or sand.

Three quarters of the damage inflicted by padded weapons and friendly grappling is short-term damage, with every fourth point of damage acting as normal damage.

A critical success with any such attack does normal damage, which can accidentally result in unintended injury to the victim.

A character recovers short-term damage at the rate of 1d3 HP per 5 minutes in each location if resting, 1d4-2 HP if not resting. The normal damage is regained at the regular rate. Healing spells that do not completely heal the injury heal all the normal damage first, then the short-term damage.

Actually, short-term damage seems to more properly injure one's fatigue state. Thus grappling, padded weapons, etc. can knock a person out by inflicting fatigue injury.

Page 43:

FATIGUE, replace with:



Total ENC Fatigue Roll

STRx1 CONx5

STRx2 CONx4

STRx3 CONx3

STRx4 CONx2

STRx5 CONx1

Short Term Fatigue Loss:

After every 5 melee rounds of extreme exertion, be it combat, running at top speed while encumbered, or using all of one's strength, characters need to make a fatigue roll to avoid fatigue loss. A failed fatigue roll means the character drops one fatigue class and suffers the associated penalties.

For example, characters engaged in a melee need to make fatigue

rolls at the end of the fifth melee round, the end of the tenth

melee round, the end of the fifteenth melee round, etc.

A character can regain a single lost fatigue class by spending an entire melee round doing nothing but resting (no attacking, parrying or dodging), essentially taking two miscellaneous actions to rest in a single melee round, or by spending two melee rounds in a row taking a single rest action and only a single dodge or parry option.

Mounted characters use only half their total ENC to determine their Fatigue Roll, and will typically only need to make fatigue rolls in a combat situation or when riding at top speed. Riding encumbered is less exhausting than moving on foot while encumbered. A quick way to estimate this, should the gamemaster not want to go through the exact calculation, is to increase the mounted character's Fatigue Roll by one class, to a maximum of CONx5. For example, a character with a normal Fatigue Roll of CONx3 due to encumbrance should use a Fatigue Roll of CONx4 when mounted.

I like this idea, but am not certain on the implementation. Mounted characters generally do not pay fatigue costs for the portion of the load carried by the mount. The effectiveness of a mount's load carrying depends on the design of the load (e.g. horse armor vs. foot armor), and such. In addition, sitting in a load is easier than walking with it -- which this set of rules seems to reflect well.

FATIGUE CLASSES

Normal The character is not fatigued. The fatigue

status a character will normally start with.

Tired Add 5 to all percentile rolls made by the

character (assuming a low result is desired,

otherwise subtract 5).

Weary Add 10 to all percentile rolls made by the

character (assuming a low result is desired,

otherwise subtract 10).

Exhausted Divide the character's skills in half and

add 20 to all percentile rolls made by the

character (assuming a low result is desired,

otherwise subtract 20).

Incapacitated The character can only act on a CONx1 roll (in which

case he or she should be treated as if Exhausted).

Otherwise, the character can do nothing but rest

(note that this will generally restore them to Exhausted

status after a single melee round of uninterrupted rest).

Regardless of any adds to percentile rolls due to fatigue class, a natural roll of 01 will remain an 01, typically a critical. A natural roll of 00 or any roll modified over 100 will have the same effect as a roll of 00, typically a fumble.

If, for example, a Sword of Humakt with 100% Broadsword skill

becomes Tired, if he rolls an 02, normally a critical, it becomes

an 07, simply a special result. If he had rolled a natural 01, it

while

Weary, and rolls a 91, normally a hit, it would become a 101,

which would be treated as a result of an 00, or a fumble. If he

became Exhausted, his Broadsword skill would be reduced to 50%

and a roll of 05, normally a special, would become a 25, or a

normal hit.

Please note that with this system, ENC values are no longer adjusted for SIZ over 20, 30, 40, etc. Higher STR compensates for greater armor encumbrance due to higher SIZ.

Long Term Fatigue Loss:

One's fatigue class can also be affected by long distance movement, among other factors. The total distance covered on foot will have the following effects on a character's fatigue class:

20 kilometers Tired

40 kilometers Weary

60 kilometers Exhausted

80 kilometers Incapacitated

The above figures assume movement on a good road, very good path or very clear terrain by a human on foot. 80 kilometers/day, spread over roughly 10 hours at 8 kilometers/hour, is the practical maximum daily movement rate for humans on foot over such terrain. The practical maximum daily movement rate for most mounted riders over such terrain is 60 kilometers/day.

When crossing more difficult terrain, multiply the above distances and the practical maximum daily movement rate by the appropriate percentage for the terrain:

Road, good path, very smooth terrain (default) 100%

Poor road, average path, or smooth terrain 75%

Rough terrain 50%

Major river Takes one day to cross

unless a bridge,

ford or ferry exists.

Light vegetation 85%

Medium vegetation 70%

Heavy vegetation, marsh or swamp 50%

(Vegetation has no effect on movement along a road or path).

Rolling Hills 70%

Mountains 30%

The above modifiers are cumulative. A character moving on foot on a average path in the mountains will move at 75% x 30% = 22.5% the normal rates, therefore checking fatigue every 4.5 kilometers, with a practical maximum daily movement rate of 18 kilometers.

This is where I put my marching, running a jogging skills into play, allowing better movement rates at lower fatigue as the roads/paths got worse.

A character can prevent a reduction in fatigue class due to long distance movement by making a single Fatigue Roll (as appropriate for ENC and STR), which if successful prevent the loss of a single fatigue class. Only one such Fatigue Roll can be made in a day, either after the first 20 kilometers of travel or if not checked then, checked at a time something occurs in which fatigue class would play a role.

The March skill can also prevent reductions in fatigue class due to long distance movement on foot (use Ride skill for mounted movement, see below). A single March skill roll can be made once a day as well. A successful roll will prevent the loss of a single additional fatigue class, a special roll will prevent the loss of two fatigue classes, and a critical roll will prevent the loss of three fatigue classes.

For example, Honorius the Hoplite, with a CON of 15 and a Fatigue Roll

of CONx3 due to his encumbrance, and a March skill of 54%, travels 44 kilometers over the course of a day before running into a possibly

hostile encounter. The player and GM proceed to check Honorius'

current fatigue class. After 40 kilometers of travel the character

would normally have a fatigue class of Weary. However, making the

single Fatigue Roll Honorius is entitled to, and rolling a 28,

Honorius's status is only reduced to Tired. Since the situation

seems likely to result in combat, Honorius' player makes a March

skill roll for the day as well, rolling a 51, a success that

brings his fatigue class to Normal, so Honorius is in perfect

condition should a fight break out.

However, I pro rated fatigue by skill rather than making rolls. Under normal circumstances, a 50% March skill, ought to reduce fatigue loss by at least 50% without a roll -- similar to picking up a drink without having to make a grab roll. Rolls should only come under difficult circumstances where the skill is opposed by more than the passive resistance of the world at large -- just like the picking up a drink example.

Fatigue class loss due to long term fatigue can only be regained by long term rest. Spending one third of the time spent traveling resting or half the time spent traveling moving at a slow walk with rests (generally at most 1 kilometer/hour) will result in regaining a single fatigue class. Further rest or slow walking will restore further lost fatigue classes, as above.

For example, at the day's end Honorius the Hoplite has covered 80

kilometers over 10 hours of moving at top speed, and due to long term

fatigue loss, his current fatigue class is Weary. Were he to engage

in melee, he would fight as if Weary, and after 5 melee rounds, would

have to make a fatigue roll to avoid dropping to Exhausted status (a

melee round of rest would restore his fatigue class to Weary, but it

could not be restored past Weary without long term rest).

If Honorius

spent 3 hours and 20 minutes resting, his fatigue class would increase

to Tired. Another 3 hours and 20 minutes of rest or would increase his

fatigue class to Normal. As mentioned above, regardless of long term

fatigue status, 80 kilometers travel over a day is the practical limit

of travel on foot for a normal human being. Fatigue classes would drop

very rapidly beyond that point.

A similar system is used for figuring long term fatigue loss for mounted characters. Riding is not quite as exhausting for characters as is moving on foot. Characters riding at a normal pace (up to 40 kilometers/day) will suffer a reduction in fatigue class to Tired. Characters riding at an all out pace (more than 40 kilometers a day) will suffer a reduction in fatigue class to Weary.

The mount itself, which typically has a maximum daily movement rate of 60 kilometers over very clear terrain, will have to check for fatigue loss every 15 kilometers, and may well end up Exhausted or Incapacitated at after being ridden for 60 kilometer. A characters fatigue class loss due to long term fatigue from riding can be decreased by a Fatigue Roll, as with loss from foot travel, and in addition a successful Ride roll will have the same effect as does March skill for movement on foot. Skilled riders will rarely suffer adverse long term fatigue effects from mounted travel.

Note that some other conditions, typically adverse environmental conditions (extreme heat or cold, thin air, etc.) can also affect long term fatigue status. These will typically increase fatigue class loss by one class. Covering any reasonable distance even on a good road in adverse conditions results in Tired status, covering 20 kilometers results in Weary status, etc. The additional loss of fatigue due to adverse conditions can be avoided by a successful Survival skill roll, where appropriate. Long term fatigue loss can also be inflicted on characters that are sick or suffering the effects of serious injuries or certain poisons, at the gamemasters option.



Page 44:

CONSEQUENCES OF ENCUMBRANCE FOR DODGING, replace with:

Consequences of Encumbrance

For normal SIZ creatures (SIZ 1-20), each point of ENC subtracts 1 percentile from Dodge, Run, March and Maneuver; 3 percentiles from Climb and Jump; and 5 percentiles from Swim. For every 10 points of SIZ above 20, add one point to the amount of ENC required to cause a subtraction. For example, a SIZ 22 creature would suffer a subtraction for every 2 points of ENC, a SIZ 35 creature for every 3 points of ENC.

Pages 45 to 65:

COMBAT, replace most of with:

THE MELEE ROUND



A melee round is divided into four phases:

1. Statement of Intent

2. Move

3. Melee

4. Post Melee Move

The melee round is a short flexible period of time, the amount

of time required to plan and execute two actions in the course

of the melee round. For the purposes of keeping track of time,

each melee round lasts 5 seconds, but in reality a melee round

might range anywhere from 3 to 12 seconds.

1) STATEMENT OF INTENT

The players and gamemaster state for each player and non-player

character what actions each will take in the coming round.

The players and GM can simply use a convenient convention for the

order in which they declare statements of intent. One such

convention is the GM first, then each player in turn clockwise

around the table.

If a more ordered system is desired, players and non-player characters

should declare their statement of intent in an order determined by the INT of the characters. Statements of intent are made in the

order of highest INT of all characters involved in the combat

situation. Higher INT characters can decide to declare first,

or delay their statement of intent up to and until all

characters with a lower INT have declared. Resolve ties

by a die roll.



Three general types of statements of intent can be declared:

1) TRIPLE MOVE AND NO MELEE ACTIONS

Perform no Melee Actions and move up to three times your movement

rate (in 1 meter hexes) in the Move and Post Melee Move Phases.

2) DOUBLE MOVE AND ONE MELEE ACTION

Specify a single Melee Action and move up to two times your movement

rate (in 1 meter hexes) in the Move and Post Melee Move Phase.

3) SINGLE MOVE AND TWO MELEE ACTIONS

Specify two Melee Actions and move your movement rate or

less (in 1 meter hexes) in the Move and Post Melee Move Phase.

The player must specify the exact Melee Actions selected (if any)

in the Statement of Intent. Possible Melee Actions are:

1. Melee Attack

2. Missile Attack

3. Cast Spell

4. Parry

5. Dodge

6. Draw Weapon

7. Attack in Spirit Combat

8. Defend in Spirit Combat

9. Miscellaneous Action

Explanations of Melee Action Options:

1. Melee Attack: Attack with a melee weapon or make an

unarmed attack (including grapple or and knockback attacks).

If one faces more than one opponent, one can select which

opponent to attack on the SR that the attack occurs on.

If a Draw Weapon action was first used to draw the melee

weapon, add 3 SR to the weapon's normal SR. Creatures

with more than two possible sources of attacks (more than

two arms, breath weapons, etc.) can attack with up to half

of them if they select a single attack option.

2. Missile Attack: Fire a single missile weapon or throw a single weapon.

A missile attack with a ready missile or thrown weapon occurs at

DEX SR; at which time the attacker chooses a target. If a Draw Weapon

action was first used to draw the thrown weapon or draw and load the

missile weapon, add 3 SR to the missile attack.

3. Cast Spell: Cast a spell or use a magic item to produce a magical

effect. This generally occurs on DEX SR + total magic points in spell SR. If the character had to ready the spell first, add 3 SR

to the time. Divine magic never requires readying and goes off on

DEX SR unless it requires spending magic points as well (in which

case, add 1 SR per MP). If a spell takes more than 10 SR to cast,

the excess SRs carry over to the next melee round. The character

must select another Cast Spell action to complete the spell in

the following melee round, otherwise, the spell is aborted.

4. Parry: Parry all attacks from a single source (a single weapon used

by a single opponent). If the source for some reason strikes

more than once, each Parry roll after the first is at a cumulative

penalty of -10% (-10% for the second parry, -20% for the third, etc.).

If one faces more than one opponent or source of attacks, one must

select which source to parry at or before the SR of the attack.

Creatures with more than two possible means of parrying (i.e.,

more than two arms) can parry with up to half of them if they

select a single parry option.

5. Dodge: Dodge all attacks from a single opponent (even if multiple

weapons or sources of attacks are used by the opponent), though

a separate Dodge roll must be made for each attack. Attacks

landing on the same strike rank are at a -10% to Dodge skill for

each attack beyond the first (two attacks landing on the same

SR are at -10% to Dodge, three are at -20% to Dodge, etc.).

If faced by more than one opponent, one must select which opponent

one will dodge at or before the SR they attack.

6. Draw weapon: Draw and ready a single weapon or draw a new missile

and reload it in a missile weapon. In any melee round a character

chooses to draw a new missile and reload it into a missile weapon,

he or she can only move 1/3 the character's base movement rate in the

Move and Post Melee Move Phases.

7. Attack in Spirit Combat: Attack a spirit currently engaging the

character in spirit combat. See Magic Book for details.

8. Defend in Spirit Combat: Attempt to defend against a spirit

currently engaging the character in spirit combat. See Magic Book

for details.

9. Miscellaneous Action: This represents any miscellaneous brief action

or manipulation, such as shutting a door, picking up an item, looking

around carefully, etc. More complex manipulations, such as applying

First Aid, may require multiple Miscellaneous Actions to complete.

For example, most perception skills, such as Scan, Listen, etc. are

at half skill while in combat. Taking a miscellaneous action to look

around would allow the use of Scan, Listen, etc. at full skill.



Selecting two Melee Attack actions lets a character attack

all out in one of two ways. The character can attack with two

weapons (one in each hand) at their normal strike ranks.

Alternately, the character can attack twice with a single weapon

at -10% skill, with the second attack coming 3 SR after the first

attack (or on SR 10 if the first attack occurred on SR 8 or

later). Creatures with more than two possible sources of attacks (i.e., multiple limbs, breath weapons) can attack with all of them if

they select two attack options.

Selecting two Parry options lets a character parry all out

in one of two ways. The character can parry all attacks in the

course of a melee round from two sources. (There is a -20% skill

modifier if the character tries to parry two attackers with the

same 1H weapon.) Alternately, the character can ignore the

modifier for parrying multiple attacks from a single source.

Creatures with more than two possible means of parrying (i.e.,

with two or more arms) can choose to parry with all of them if they

select two parry options.

Selecting two Dodge options lets a character try to Dodge all

attacks directed against him or her during the melee round.

There is a -10% cumulative skill modifier when rolling against

each opponent after the first (-10% on the second opponent,

-20% for the third opponent, etc.). The penalty for Dodging attacks

landing on the same SR remains in effect.

Selecting two Cast Spell actions lets a character cast two spells

in the same melee round. This is only possible if the total SR

spent casting the spells adds up to 10 or less. Add the SR of the

first spell to that of the second spell to determine the SR at which the

second spell is cast. If a spell takes more than 10 SR to cast

to cast, the excess SRs carry over to the next melee round, where

the character must select another Cast Spell action to complete

the spell. Otherwise, it is aborted.

A character can combine a melee or missile attack and cast spell option

where the spell would enhance the effect of the weapon. If the character

wants to take advantage of the spell enhancement (for example, a

Speedart), the attack must take place at its normal SR or the SR the

spell went off on, whichever occurs later.

A character in spirit combat can choose to attack twice, in which case

he or she can take no other actions, including defending him or herself

from the attacking spirit, or can choose to take two defensive actions

but no other actions (see Spirit Combat).

ALTERING STATEMENT OF INTENT

A character can always abort a declared action, but can not

alter a declaration for another melee action option. One

unused melee action per melee round (even if two are available)

can be aborted to one of two possible special abort actions:

1. DEFENSIVE ABORT: A character can abort a single unused

melee action to perform either a Dodge or Parry action

at a -20% skill modifier instead.

2. MOVEMENT ABORT: A character can abort a single unused melee action

to increase his or her movement rate by one category, to double or

triple speed in the upcoming Post Melee Move Phase. This allows one

to flee or to chase after a fleeing character at higher speed.

2) MOVE PHASE

1. MOVEMENT INITIATIVE

Movement initiative is determined by the

DEX of all characters involved in the combat situation.

Higher DEX characters can decide to move first, or delay

their movement up to and until all characters with a lower

DEX have moved. Resolve ties by a die roll. The order of movement

initiative determined in the Move Phase of a Melee Round remains

in effect through the Post Melee Phase of that Melee Round.

Once hostile characters come within a range where they could

conceivably reach each other, the gamemaster and each player alternate

moving the non-player and player characters 1/3 of their current movement

rate in order of movement initiative until all movement is completed.

For example, three characters of DEX 17, DEX 14 and DEX 10 are

moving 3 meters, 6 meters and 9 meters respectively. They are

within 15 meters of each other, and so could reach each other,

so they should alternate movement. The DEX 17 character elects

to move first, and moves 1 meter. The DEX 14 character elects to

go after the DEX 10 character. The DEX 10 character then moves

3 meters. The DEX 14 character can then move up to 2 meters. If

he does not move, those 2 meters of his 6 meters of movement are

wasted. The characters then alternate moving, up to 1 meter for the

DEX 17 character (first in terms of movement initiative), up to

3 meters for the DEX 10 character (second in terms of movement

initiative) and up to 2 meters for the DEX 14 character (last

in terms of movement initiative due to his choice to delay it).

2. MOVE

Any unengaged characters move no further than they

have declared to move, in order of movement initiative.

A character who becomes engaged must stop at the point

he or she became engaged, unless the character succeeds

in a contest of Maneuver skill. In that case the character

can continue to move normally, and gains movement initiative

over the defeated target if he or she did not already have it.

A character who begins the Move Phase engaged (see below)

can only move 1/3 of his or her normal movement rate

(1 to 3 meters for humans) and must remain adjacent (in

an adjoining hex) to all figures he or she is engaged by

unless he or she succeeds in a contest of Maneuver skill.

In that case, the character can move normally, and gains

movement initiative over the defeated target if he or she

did not already have it.

A character cannot pass directly through another figure

(or hex occupied by a figure) in the Move Phase, regardless

of Maneuver skill success. The character can knock the

intervening character down or aside in the Melee phase, however,

and then continue his or her movement in the Post Melee Move Phase.

If using a hex map grid (with 1 meter hexes), a character can

shift one hex facing and then move one meter.

A character can use one meter of movement to stand still

but change facing to any orientation.

Backwards movement is at half the speed of forward movement.

To move 1 meter backwards take two meters of normal movement.

At the end of each Move and Post Melee Move Phase, every character

receives a free one hex facing shift.

Mobility spells add to one's total movement in each Move Phase,

not to one's basic movement. A human with Mobility 4 taking a

one action, two move melee round will move 10 meters in each

Move Phase, not 14 meters.

In any melee round a character concentrates upon an already cast active

spell (the concentration does not require an action) or wishes to use

a Draw Weapon melee action to draw a missile and reload a missile weapon

with it, his or her movement in the Move and Post Melee Move Phases

is limited to 1/3 of his or her normal movement (1 to 3 meters for

humans).

RULES OF ENGAGEMENT

A character that moves within 1 meter of an enemy character

that has declared a Melee Attack using a weapon under 2 meters

in length (Weapon SR 3, 2 and some 1) becomes engaged, and

must end his or her movement immediately unless the character

can succeed in a contest of Maneuver skill. On a hex

map using 1 meter hexes, the characters would have to

enter one of the three front or two side hexes of such

a hostile figure to become engaged.

A character that moves within 2 meters of an enemy character

that has declared a Melee Attack using a weapon of at least

2 meters length (long spears, thrust halberds, naginatas or

great swords) becomes engaged, and must end his or her movement

immediately unless the character can succeed in a contest of

Maneuver skill.

On a hex map using 1 meter hexes, a character

would have to enter one of the five secondary front hexes of such

a hostile figure to become engaged, and would stop with a hex in

between the character and the hostile figure. At such a range, only

characters with a weapon of at least 2 meters length can attack

each other.

Characters with shorter weapons can still parry and

dodge, but could only attack the longer weapon, not its wielder.

If the character manages to move within 1 meter (an adjacent hex)

of the longer weapon wielder, they are now at a range that both

can attack and parry normally.

A character that moves within 3 meters of an enemy character

that has declared a Melee Attack using a weapon of at least

3 meters length (pikes and sarissa) becomes engaged, and must end

his or her movement immediately unless the character can succeed in

a contest of Maneuver skill.

On a hex map using 1 meter hexes,

the character would have to enter one of the seven tertiary front

hexes of such a hostile figure to become engaged, and would stop

with two hexes in between the character and the hostile figure. At

such a range, only characters with a weapon of at least 3 meters

length can attack each other.

Characters with shorter weapons can

still parry and dodge, but could only attack the longer weapon, not

its wielder.

A Lance charge is a special case, and is resolved by allowing the

charging character moving adjacent to the figure it is attacking,

regardless of whether the figure is using a pike, long spear, or

shorter weapon. At this point normal rules of engagement go into

effect.

If the figure that was charged was wielding a pike, the pike

would strike before the lance in the upcoming Melee Phase. The lance

attack would take place before any shorter weapon attacks,

at which point shorter weapons can attack at their normal strike

ranks.

This rule only applies in an all out charge with a lance

where the riding animals damage bonus is used instead of that of the

rider. If the character with the lance is maneuvering and thrusting

with the lance as if using a spear, normal rule of engagement remain

in effect, with the normal exception that a mounted figure substitutes

Ride skill for Maneuver skill when moving in combat.

Once engaged, a character can no longer move in the Move phase

except for the free facing shift at the end of the Move phase

without winning a contest of Maneuver skill (see below).

He can, however, move without restriction in the Post Melee

Move phase.

MANEUVER SKILL: This Agility skill (Base 25%, Hard), governs

movement in melee situations. It is normally only studied by

warriors, martial artists or duelists. It covers the art of

combat movement, engaging, disengaging and closing. In any

Move Phase where two or more characters disagree about their

state of engagement or their fighting distance, they should

each roll Maneuver skill.

If they achieve the same level of

success (that is, both fumble, both fail, both succeed, both

special or both critical), nothing changes. If one character

achieves a higher level of success than the other (succeeds where

the other fails, specials where the other succeeds, etc.),

he or she acts as if disengaged, with the loser remaining engaged.

If a character begins a Move Phase adjacent to an opponent

using a longer weapon, such as a long spear against a sword,

Maneuver skill can be used to close with the longer weapon

wielder.

A success in a contest of Maneuver skills (as

above) allows the winner to close with his or her opponent,

moving into the opponents hex, with the normal effect for closing

against a long weapon. A character that is already closed

can move back to a normal range if he or she succeeds in a

contest of Maneuver skill.

Note that with a very long weapon,

such as a pike or sarissa, characters within 1 meter (in an

adjacent hex) should be treated as closed. They do not need

to enter the pike wielders hex to gain the effects for

closing against a long weapon.

Some weapons close better than others. Note the Zulu experience with long and short spears.

A character fumbling a Maneuver roll must stop all movement at that

point, and is not even entitled to the free one hex facing shift

normally available at the end of the Move Phase.

Every meter of basic movement rate higher than an opponent adds +5%

to Maneuver skill rolls made against that opponent.

COMBAT MOVEMENT IN UNRELIABLE TERRAIN

Four types of terrain are defined: clear, restricted,

difficult, and very difficult.

Clear: No DEX or Maneuver skill test.

Restricted: Maneuver skill or DEX x 5 for each move of more than

the character's unmodified movement rate.

Difficult: Maneuver skill or DEX x 5 for each move of the

character's unmodified movement rate.

Very Difficult: Maneuver skill or DEX x 3 for each move of the

character's unmodified movement rate.

Crossing over a dead or unconscious fallen body of human size, or

a conscious fallen friendly figure is a Difficult test (DEXx5).

Crossing over stacked dead or unconscious fallen bodies of human size, or

a conscious fallen unfriendly figure is a Very Difficult test (DEXx3).

Jump or Acrobatics skill can be used to cross difficult

terrain instead of Maneuver skill or a DEX roll, but only if the difficult terrain feature is narrow enough to be cleared by the

distance covered by a single Jump or Acrobatics attempt. Otherwise

immediately test DEX or Maneuver skill as above at the completion of

the Jump or flip.

Note: 'Movement Rate' is your character's normal movement

rate, NOT the modified movement rate (for example, if

Mobility 1 is cast on a character with movement rate of 3,

his unmodified movement rate is 3, not 4).

Fumble: The character falls down, loses any remaining

actions that round, and takes 1D6 falling damage (with a possible

modifier for the type of terrain).

Failure: Character falls down at the point they entered the terrain

(or half-way through movement, if already in the terrain).

Critical: The character uses the terrain to advantage,

and gets a 10 percentile bonus to all attacks and defenses

that round.

FALLEN CHARACTERS

A character that falls in the course of a melee round cannot stand

up until the next melee round's Move Phase. A successful Acrobatics

or Breakfall skill roll allows the character to stand in that

melee round's Post Melee Move Phase, and can move and engage

normally in next melee rounds Move Phase.

Otherwise, moving from

a prone position to a kneeling position takes a single move action

(3 meters of movement for a normal human), moving from a kneeling

position to a standing position takes another move action. In other

words, a character going from a prone position to a standing position

will only have a single melee or move action left to use. A fallen

character cannot force engagement on other characters while

he or she remains on the ground.

A character that fell in the course of a Move or Post Melee Move

will normally be unable to stand until the next movement phase,

either Move or Post Melee Move. A successful Acrobatics or Breakfall

skill roll will negate the effects of the fall. If the character

succeeds in the roll, the may ignore the fall and proceed normally

(rolling or flipping out of the fall).

3) MELEE PHASE

Resolve all melee actions in Strike Rank order.

4) POST MELEE MOVE PHASE

All characters can move again as in the Move Phase, except that

engagement rules do not apply (Rules of Engagement are not in

effect). A character still cannot pass directly through a space occupied by another character unless that character is prone or

the moving character pushed the target aside in the Melee Phase.

CRITICAL HITS

A critical attack will normally ignore all armor, including that from protective spells. As it is also a special success, it will typically have an additional effect depending on the weapon and mode of attack used.

COMBAT OPTIONS

Characters may choose to fight in one of the following offensive or defensive modes. One must specify the exact mode in the character's statement of intent. Some special fighting modes allow one replace the default results for a special success with the special result specific to the mode. Modes marked with an "@" sign are unusual, and are not normally available without special training.



MELEE AND MISSILE ATTACKS

Melee and missile weapons normally function in one of the following three default modes, each with a specific result occurring on a special success roll (a special hit):

Slash (Cutting weapons): Full weapon damage to head, limbs or abdomen,

normal weapon damage otherwise.

Crush (Blunt weapons): Ignores half armor (on all locations).

Does full damage bonus to head, chest or abdomen,

normal damage bonus to other locations.

Impale (Thrusting weapons): Double weapon damage to head, chest or

abdomen, normal weapon damage otherwise.

SPECIAL TACTICS

A number of different tactics can be used in a combat situation. Some techniques, including the standard attack, parry and dodge can be used by all characters. On a special (or critical) hit, a special success effect will generally take place, dependent on the mode of attack and weapon used.

The default specials listed above (Slash, Crush and Impale) take place on a special success using a standard attack. Other special effects take place using other modes of attack. Unless marked by a "@", the special tactics listed below are available to all characters.

Special tactics marked by a "@" require special training, and are not normally available to all characters. Learning to use such a special tactic with a weapon or set of weapons requires spending a certain number of hours studying the tactic (the exact amount is listed under each tactic).

The instructor must know how to use the tactic with that set of weapons before he can teach the tactic to anyone. The instructor must succeed in an Instruct skill roll, or, with a failed Instruct roll is failed, the student must succeed in a weapon skill roll to learn the tactic.

The character can then use the tactic with a specific weapon (or set of related weapons, i.e., Shortsword and Kukri, Broadsword and other 1H Swords, etc.). A character can attempt to research a special tactic, but this requires spending three times the listed training time and then succeeding in a weapon skill roll.

Special tactics for melee and missile weapons:

Aimed Shot: A melee or missile attack aimed at a specific hit

location is at half the normal chance to hit. It might

very well take more than a single melee round to land

an aimed shot.

MELEE ATTACKS

Special tactics for melee attacks:

Slam: Attempt to knock an opponent aside or down by moving directly

through them with your body. The attack is made as if making an

attack with Weapon SR 3, and does not normally do any damage

other than what may be incurred from the knockback. The Slam

attack is at DEXx3 or Grapple skill, whichever is higher.

The attacker does his STR plus SIZ in points of knockback damage

(see Knockback).

The fact that the attack does not penetrate armor

is already factored into the Slam. The amount of knockback is

doubled for a special or critical roll. A critical success on a

Slam attempt additionally forces the defender to make a DEXx1 roll

to remain standing, and another DEXx1 roll to retain a grip on any

held (though not strapped on) items. The attack can be dodged or

parried normally.

Bash: Attempt to knock an opponent aside or down by pushing them or

striking them with a weapon or object. The attack takes place

at the normal SR and attack skill for the weapon used, and does

not normally do any damage (other than that which may be incurred

from the knockback).

The attacker adds the average of his or her

STR plus SIZ to the rolled weapon damage to determine the total

amount of knockback damage done (see Knockback). Thrusting weapons

must be used in a crushing or cutting mode (staff or halberd) to

effectively add to a Bash attempt, and smaller weapons (SR 3) are

generally ineffective.

Disarm: Attempt to disarm an opponent by attacking their weapon,

using either brute force or finesse. The attack is resolved

normally, with the appropriate modifiers for the smaller

size of the weapon being attacked. The attack must be a

special success for the disarming attempt to have any chance

of success.

On a special hit, one can attempt to disarm the

opponent by matching either STR vs. STR (STRx1.5 if the target

weapon is held with two hands) or DEX vs. DEX (DEXx1.5 if the

target weapon is held with two hands), at the attackers option.

The STR test better represents a brute force approach, the DEX

test a subtler approach. If the resistance test succeeds, the

target weapon is knocked 0 to 5 meters (1d6-1) from its wielder

in a random direction (0 meters means it lands at his or her

feet). Short weapons such as daggers are not particularly well

suited for this task, and if used will only allow matching STR/2

or DEX/2 against STR or DEX.

Break Weapon: Strike at an opponent's weapon. The attack is resolved

normally, with the appropriate modifiers for the smaller

size of the weapon being attacked. Impaling weapons cannot

effectively damage an opponent's weapon unless they are used

in a cutting or crushing mode.

If the weapon being attacked

is used to parry the attack, and achieves an equal degree of

success (i.e., a special parry against a special attack), it

will suffer 1 armor point of damage from the attack if the

damage done exceeds the parrying weapon's armor points. If

the attack has a higher degree of success (i.e., a special

attack against a normal parry), or the weapon attacked is

not used to parry the attack, all damage in excess of

the target weapon's armor points is suffered by the weapon.

The default special hit results do not occur when attacking

an opponent's weapon.

@Entangle: If using a flexible weapon, the attacker can opt to attempt

to entangle an opponent or opponent's weapon on a special hit

instead of use the default special hit result for the weapon.

The attack is rolled normally, and a special success entangles

the hit location struck or the weapon attacked, doing only half

the normal weapon damage and with no other special effect.

An

entangled hit location is immobilized on a successful

STR vs. STR roll, an entangled weapon pulled out of the grasp

of its wielder on a STR vs. STR roll (or STR vs. STRx1.5 if the

attacking weapon was held in both hands), landing 0 to 5 meters

(1d6-1) away in a random direction (if 0 meters, at the

wielder's feet). It takes 50 hours of training to learn to use

Entangle with a specific weapon (or set of related weapons).

@Feint: An attack that trades force for evasion and deception. A

special success does normal damage but subtracts half the

attackers attack skill with that weapon from any parry or

dodge by the defender.

A critical feint does normal damage

ignoring armor, but subtracts the attackers attack skill

with that weapon from any parry or dodge by the defender.

It takes 400 hours of training to learn to use Feint with

a specific weapon (or set of related weapons).

@Flurry: A flurry or series of quick blows. A special success does

normal damage, but allows a second free attack, this one

in the default mode of the weapon. The second blow lands

DEX SR after the first. A critical flurry does normal

damage ignoring armor, and results in the second attack

at worst hitting (roll, but miss and fumble results are

treated as normal hits). The second attack lands DEX SR

after the first attack or SR 10, whichever is earlier.



Using a weapon in flurry mode requires STR at least 3 above the

minimum weapon STR; or STR at least 1 above the minimum weapon

STR, and DEX at least 3 above the minimum weapon DEX. It takes

400 hours of training to learn to use Flurry with a specific

weapon (or set of related weapons).

@Aimed Blow: An attack that trades force for precision. On a special,

the attack does normal damage, but allows the attacker to

select the hit location struck. To use the technique

requires a minimum DEX of 13. It takes 200 hours of

training to learn to use Aimed Blow with a specific

weapon (or set of related weapons).

MELEE PARRIES:

Standard Parry: The normal parry result. If used with a bladed weapon,

it will damage an attacking weapon if the attackers

attack roll was a failure. Hafted bladed weapons (axes)

and long hafted bladed weapons (halberds) will only

damage attacking weapons on a special or critical parry

result, respectively. The parrying weapon will normally

suffer 1 armor point of damage from any attack it parries

that does damage in excess of the parrying weapon's

armor points, and the excess damage passes on to strike

the parrying character.

A special parry will cause the

parrying weapon to take no damage from normal or special

attacks that exceed its armor points, although the

excess damage will still pass on to strike the parrying

character normally. A critical parry stops all damage

from an attack, even a critical attack or an attack that

exceeded the parrying weapon's armor points, and the

parrying weapon takes no damage.

Special tactics for melee parries:

@Swordbreaking: A character with a swordbreaker mounted on their

parrying weapon that knows how to use it properly

can attempt to catch an attacking weapon. On a

special parry roll, the character catches the attacking

weapon, and can attempt to disarm his or her opponent,

or to damage the attacking weapon, possibly breaking it.

To disarm, the character must succeed in a STR vs. STR

roll on the resistance table (STR vs. STRx1.5 if the

opponent's weapon is held in both hands).

If the roll

succeeds, the opponent's weapon lands 0-2 meters (1d3-1)

away in a random direction. If the parrying character

opts to damage the attacking weapon, he will do the

swordbreaker's damage plus his or her damage bonus

directly to the armor points of the attacking weapon,

which may result in the weapon breaking. If the damage

done by the swordbreaker does not equal or exceed the

attacking weapon's AP, the weapon takes only 1 AP of

damage. On a critical parry the character can either

automatically disarm the opponent or do double damage,

if her or she opts to damage the attacking weapon.

It takes 100 hours of training to learn to use

Swordbreaking with a specific swordbreaker (or

set of related swordbreakers).

@Glancing Parry: A defensive parry. It will not damage an attacking

weapon, instead attempting to redirect the force of

the blow. On a special parry, it doubles the AP of

the parrying weapon for that blow only. On a critical,

no damage is done to the defender or parrying weapon.



If used with a shield, it only adds half again the

shield's armor points on a special parry. To use a

weapon in Glancing Parry mode one must have a DEX at

least 3 higher than the minimum weapon DEX. It takes

400 hours of training to learn to use Glancing Parry

with a specific weapon (or set of related weapons).

@Active Parry: An offensive parry that attempts to damage or knock

away an attacking weapon. With an Active Parry, special

parries with a bladed weapon do their normal damage

against the parried weapon, even on a successful attack.

However, the parrying weapon will take damage from

normal and special attacks.

A critical Active Parry

automatically disarms the opponent (with the weapon

landing 0 - 5 meters away in a random direction), but

the parrying weapon will take damage from normal and

special attacks, and will not automatically stop all

damage from reaching the parrying character. It takes

200 hours of training to learn to use Active Parry with

a specific weapon (or set of related weapons).

@Weave: A defensive parry that incorporates a dodge. The parry

will not damage an attacking weapon, and the parrying weapon

can be damaged by any attack that exceeds its armor points,

even on a special or critical parry. When using Weave, on a

special a free dodge roll is allowed to evade any damage from

the attack that blew through the initial parry.

On a critical

success the character takes no damage (although the parrying

weapon might). It takes 400 hours of training to learn to use Weave with a specific weapon (or set of related weapons).

@Riposte: An offensive parry. The parry will not damage an attacking

weapon, and the parrying weapon can be damaged by any attack

that exceeds its armor points, even on a special or critical

parry. A critical parry using Riposte will block only its

armor points in damage, not all damage as does a standard

parry.

When using Riposte, on a special parry the riposter

is set up for a free attack with the parrying weapon. This

blow comes on the SR following the parried attack, or SR 10,

whichever comes first, and does not count as an action.

Characters being hit by a riposte may parry or dodge the

riposte normally if they have a parry declared against the

riposting weapon or a dodge declared against the riposter

that round. A critical riposte allows the riposter to

automatically hit on the riposte.

Roll the attack anyway,

to check for specials or criticals, but the blow hits, even

if the attack roll is a miss. A fumbled attack becomes a simple

miss. It takes 400 hours of training to learn to use Riposte

with a specific weapon (or set of related weapons).

MELEE DODGING

Dodge: Base Dodge skill is 15%. Dodge is a Hard Agility skill.

A normal dodge causes a normal hit to miss, a special hit to

become a normal hit, and a critical hit to become a special hit.

A special dodge causes a special or normal hit to miss, and a

critical hit to become a normal hit.

A critical dodge causes a

critical, special or normal hit to miss. A fumbled dodge

improves an opponents attack by one degree of success: Only a

fumbled attack misses. A missed attack hits, a hit specials,

and a critical hit does maximum damage.

Special tactics for dodging:

@Counter: An offensive dodge. A special dodge using Counter is treated

as a normal dodge, but the counterer is set up for a free

attack with the ready weapon. This blow comes on the SR

following the countered attack, or SR 10, whichever comes

first, and does not count as an action. Characters being hit

by a counter may parry or dodge the counter if they have a

parry declared against the countering weapon or a dodge

declared against the counterer that round.

A critical dodge

using Counter is treated as a special dodge, but the

counterattack that follows automatically hits. Roll the attack

anyway, to check for specials or criticals, but the blow hits,

even if the attack roll misses. A fumbled attack roll is treated as a simple miss. It takes 400 hours of training to

learn to use Counter with a specific weapon (or set of related

weapons).

All of my added paragraph breaks in this section are double tabbed to highlight where I've added breaks. I think additional breaks are necessary to reduce some of the large blocks of text to more readable blips.



Page 63:

PARRYING AND DODGING MISSILE WEAPONS, replace with:

Thrown weapons and missile weapons can be dodged if the dodger

is aware of the attack and ready to dodge. At point blank range

<will be defined for each weapon, for now approximate using

one tenth the weapon's effective range>, a dodge is at one fifth

percentage against a projected missile weapon such as a

bow or crossbow (effectively, you need a special dodge success

to counter a normal hit, or a critical dodge success to counter

a special hit), and at half percentage against a thrown missile

weapon, such as a rock or thrown knife.

Note that even though missiles and thrown weapons are harder to

dodge at point blank due to a decrease in the reaction time

available to the dodger, the penalties to hit a moving

target are doubled, due to the increased difficulty of

tracking a target at closer range.

"Point blank range" and missile users varies as to the missile whether or not there is increased difficulty. The "firing a missile weapon while engaged" section is a better limit.

Firing a missile weapon while engaged is considerably more

difficult. If a character with a missile weapon starts the

melee round adjacent to an opponent, missile attacks are

at half percentage. Thrown weapon attacks are at normal

percentages. However, if the opponent chooses to dodge the

missile or thrown weapon attack, his or her dodge skill is

at full. It is easier to dodge a missile weapon or thrown

weapon when directly adjacent to the source of the attack.

Small thrown weapons that are difficult to parry, such as knives

or shuriken, are parried by a weapon at only the normal

chance of success. Any shield will parry them normally. Projected

missiles at normal ranges are parried by a weapon at 1/5 normal

percentage, or a hoplite or larger shield at normal

percentage, and at point blank range they can only be parried

by a critical weapon parry or a hoplite or larger

shield at 1/5 normal percentage. Instead of parrying,

shields can be used to cover locations.

DODGING BY LARGE CREATURES

Very large creatures, such as giants, will have trouble dodging much smaller opponents if they are physically attacking them in

such a way as to expose themselves to a counterattack. A large

giant kicking or punching a human will not be able to dodge

an attack directed at the attacking arm or leg. This is also

true for humans trying to kick or punch a rubble runner.

When using a weapon that lets them stay out of reach, the larger

creature can dodge normally, even though this will generally more

represent skillful footwork on the larger creature's part than

weaving and dodging.

Missile or thrown weapons fire directed at a

very large creature by a much smaller one should be treated as point

blank range fire even out to normal weapon ranges for the purpose of

being dodged by the larger creature, and the normal doubling of

movement penalties at point blank range should not be used if the

larger creature is moving. These rules generally come into play only

when a creature has at least four times the SIZ of its opponent.

FLEXIBLE WEAPONS

Parrying a flexible or chain weapon such as a whip or flail with a weapon or buckler parry is at parry skill.

Parrying a flexible or chain weapon with a shield parry is at 3/4 parry skill, assuming the shield used is larger than a buckler.

Flexible or chain weapons have a double normal chance of a fumble.

Page 49:

KNOCKBACK, replace with:

If the amount of damage done by a weapon equals or exceeds a

targets SIZ, it will cause knockback, moving the target back by

1 meter and forcing the target to make a DEX X 5 roll to remain

standing. Every 10 points of damage above the targets SIZ adds

an additional meter of knockback and reduces the DEX roll by

one multiple (i.e., DEXx4 for 2 meters of knockback, etc.).

Weapons that do not penetrate armor (all crushing weapons, or

a slashing or impaling weapon that did not penetrate armor)

do double damage for the purposes of knockback. Impaling

weapons that impale and do damage do no knockback.

If the target

of knockback is mounted, and succeeds in a Ride roll, the SIZ of

the mount is added to that of the targets for determining knockback.

If the Ride roll is unsuccessful and the DEX roll is failed, or if

more than 1 m of knockback was inflicted, the target will be knocked

off his or her mount.



Page 49:

BRACING AGAINST KNOCKBACK, replace with:

It is possible to brace oneself against knockback prior to an

opponent's attack. One cannot dodge while braced, and a character

that braced in a melee round cannot move in the Post Melee Move

Phase of that melee round. Once braced, damage done must be higher

than the STR + SIZ of the braced figure to cause knockback.

Page 50:

KNOCKBACK INTO SMALL OBJECTS, PEOPLE AND SOLID OBJECTS, replace with:

If the target of knockback travels far enough to hit something

behind him, he must make another DEX X 5 roll to remain standing,

as must the object, if it is a living or animate creature.

If the target was knocked back and hit a creature or free

standing object, both take 1d6 damage to a random location for

every two meters of knockback incurred (the full distance need

not be traveled). If the object hit was a solid, unyielding

object (wall, boulder, rock cliff), the amount of damage is

doubled.



Page 52:

HIT LOCATIONS OF MOUNTED TARGETS. Add:



Mounted characters fighting footmen also get the advantages of high ground (page 54).



Page 52:

PROHIBITED MOUNTED WEAPONS, replace with:

Two handed hacking weapons used while mounted are used at

3/4 their normal attack and parry skills.

Page 54:

HIGH GROUND, replace with:



A character that is standing at least half again higher than his or her target has a high ground advantage. This means that the character rolls 1D10+10 for all hit location rolls for his attacks with one-handed melee weapons, and can choose to do so with a two-handed melee weapon as well. The higher character also has 10 percent added to all of his or her attacks and parries against a lower character. Mounted characters fighting footmen gain the advantage of high ground.

Page 60:

GRAPPLING, replace with:

A successful Grapple attack grasps a random hit location of

an opponent. A successful dodge evades the attack. A successful

parry with a weapon means that the weapon was caught instead; a

successful shield parry indicates that the shield has been

caught.

A shield or hafted weapon that is caught can be held

for a further grappling attempt to immobilize the weapon or

throw the opponent. A bladed weapon that is caught can not normally

be held. If the grapple attack roll was a special success, the

parrying weapon or shield arm was caught instead. A successful

Grapple parry will block the attack.

After the first successful Grapple attack, subsequent Grapple

rolls can be used to attempt to immobilize an opponent, throw

an opponent, or inflict damage upon them.

To immobilize an opponent (using the hit location grappled)

one must succeed in a second Grapple attack at DEX SR in the

next melee round. If the second roll fails, the opponent

is released. If the second Grapple roll succeeds, roll

STR vs. STR on the resistance table to immobilize the

opponent/location.

If the resistance roll fails,

the opponent is not immobilized, but the location is still held.

An immobilized opponent can free themselves in subsequent

melee rounds if they succeed in a STR vs. STR roll and the

grappler does not (one attempt each a round at the held

characters DEX SR).

To throw an opponent one must succeed in a second Grapple attack

at DEX SR in the next melee round. If the second roll fails,

the opponent is released. If the second Grapple roll succeeds,

roll STR+DEX vs. SIZ+DEX of opponent on the resistance table

to throw the opponent. If the opponent does not succeed in a

DEXx1, Acrobatics/2, or Breakfall roll, he or she takes 1d6

damage to a random hit location, more if the fall is from a

greater height, armor protecting at best at half value.

If the

resistance roll fails, the opponent is not thrown, but the

location is still held.

I have to disagree. A proper throw should



a. Allow the Grapple skill to affect the STR+DEX vs. STR+DEX test.

b. Throw an opponent into the ground rather than on to the ground. The difference in method is important in the damage done. While the rules above cover sport skills (e.g. Judo), in a proper throw the damage should be d6 + the STR of the thrower/SIZ of the throwee [damage bonus]. In throwing an opponent into the ground, "saving throws" of the various types (DEX, Acrobatics and Breakfall) are pretty worthless.

To damage an opponent one must succeed in a second Grapple

attack at DEX SR in the next melee round. If the second roll fails, the opponent is released. If the second Grapple roll

succeeds, roll 1d4 damage plus damage bonus versus the hit

location held. Armor only counts for half its normal value.

Protective spells have full value.



Note, in the rules as currently promulgated, a hold to damage does more of an injury than a throw and is easier. From experience, I know that arm locks, chokes and leg locks are generally more difficult to obtain than throws and harder to "set" (i.e. use to maximize damage rather than continue the hold). Of course you may want to do as I did in Shattered Norns and make the Grapple rules cover unskilled grappling combat.

Page 60:

MELEE WEAPONS TABLE. Corrections:

All daggers impale, naginatas slash instead of impaling



Page 64:

MISSILE WEAPONS TABLE. Correction:



Javelin damage is 1d10, not 1d8.

Page 68:

POINTS FOR OVERLAPPING ARMOR, replace with:

As described above, it is possible to wear soft or leather

armor under another armor to provide added protection.

When overlapping armor (i.e., plate over chain), only half the

armor points of the lower valued piece are added to the higher

valued piece, rounding up (i.e., soft leather under plate will

add 1 point of protection, bezainted 2 points, ringmail 3 points,

and chainmail 4 points). In addition, the ENC value of the lower

valued armor is doubled.



Pages 71-79:

SKILLS, replace and add to as appropriate:



Skills normally fall into three categories: Easy, Medium or Hard.

Note that a number of the skills that follow are very specific professional skills. A character does not need to know Intimidate to put a sword to someone's throat and threaten them effectively. Some skills have a degree of overlap. When bargaining, a character that does not know Bargain but is very skilled at Fast Talk may be able to get some use out of that skill instead.

These skills exist to add flavor and to help describe both PCs and NPCs in greater detail, but not to make it impossible to attempt something if a character lacks the skill. In such cases, the GM has to decide what the character's chances are, which will often depend on the situation, what the character does, how the player roleplays the situation, the character's background, etc.

SKILLS LIST

Experience Training

Skill Base Category Difficulty Gain Avail.

Acrobatics 0% Agility Hard Yes Rare

Act 5% Communication Hard Yes Rare

Administrate 5% Knowledge Medium Yes Rare

Balance 5% Agility Easy Yes Rare

Bargain 5% Communication Hard Yes

Battle 5% Knowledge Easy Yes Rare

Beg 5% Communication Easy Yes Rare

Boat 5% Agility Easy Yes

Breakfall 0% Agility Easy Yes Rare

Bribe 5% Communication Easy Yes Rare

Catch 15% Manipulation Easy Yes

Ceremony 5% Magic Medium Yes

Climb 40% Agility Easy Yes

Conceal 5% Manipulation Medium Yes Rare

Converse 10% Communication Easy Yes Rare

Courtesan 10% Communication Medium Yes Rare

Craft Varies Knowledge Varies Yes Varies

Dance 5% Agility Easy Yes Common

Debate 5% Communication Medium Yes Rare

Devise 0% Manipulation Hard Yes Rare

Disarm Traps 5% Manipulation Medium Yes Rare

Dodge 15% Agility Hard Yes Rare

Drive 10% Manipulation Easy Yes

Enchant 0% Magic Hard Yes Rare

Escape 5% Manipulation Medium Yes Rare

Etiquette Varies Communication Easy Yes Varies

Evaluate 5% Knowledge Medium Yes

Feel 5% Perception Hard Yes Rare

Fast Draw 0% Manipulation Easy Yes Rare

Fast Talk 5% Communication Medium Yes

First Aid 10% Knowledge Easy Yes

Hide 10% Stealth Easy Yes

Instruct 5% Knowledge Medium Yes Rare

Interrogate 0% Communication Medium Yes Rare

Intimidate 5% Communication Easy Yes Rare

Intrigue 0% Knowledge Hard Yes Rare

Jump 25% Agility Easy Yes

Juggle 5% Manipulation Easy Yes Rare

Lip Read 0% Perception Hard Yes Rare

Listen 25% Perception Medium Yes Rare

Lore 0% Knowledge Varies No Varies

Maneuver 25% Agility Hard Yes Rare

March 5% Agility Easy Yes Rare

Martial Arts 0% Knowledge Hard No Rare

Martial Hold 0% Manipulation Hard Yes Rare

Martial Throw 0% Manipulation Hard Yes Rare

Memorize 0% Knowledge Medium No Rare

Mimic 5% Knowledge Easy Yes Rare Orate 5% Communication Medium Yes

Pickpocket 5% Manipulation Easy Yes Rare

Pick Locks 5% Manipulation Easy Yes Rare

Play 0% Manipulation Varies Yes

Read/Write 0% Knowledge Varies No Varies

Ride 5% Agility Medium Yes Common

Run 5% Agility Easy Yes

Sail 0% Agility Medium Yes

Scan 25% Perception Easy Yes

Scout 30% Perception Easy Yes Rare

Search 25% Perception Medium Yes Rare

Set Traps 5% Manipulation Easy Yes

Shadow 5% Stealth Medium Yes Rare

Sing 5% Communication Easy Yes Common

Shiphandling 0% Knowledge Medium Yes

Shield Parry Varies Agility Varies Yes Common

Sleight 5% Manipulation Medium Yes Rare

Smell 5% Perception Hard Yes Rare

Sneak 10% Stealth Medium Yes Rare

Sorcery Skills 0% Magic Varies No Rare

Sorcery Spells 0% Magic Varies Yes Rare

Speak 0% Communication Varies Yes Varies

Spirit Combat 25% Magic Hard Yes Rare

Spirit Sense 25% Perception Hard Yes Rare

Spirit Travel 10% Magic Hard Yes Rare

Summon 0% Magic Hard No Rare

Survival 5% Knowledge Easy Yes

Swim 15% Manipulation Easy Yes

Taste 5% Perception Hard Yes Rare

Throw 25% Manipulation Medium Yes

Torture 5% Manipulation Medium Yes Rare

Track 5% Perception Medium Yes

Treat Disease 5% Knowledge Medium Yes Rare

Treat Poison 5% Knowledge Medium Yes Rare

Ventriloquism 0% Knowledge Easy Yes Rare

Weapon Attack Varies Manipulation Varies Yes Varies

Weapon Parry Varies Agility Varies Yes Varies

Good list. I would add a column for cross-reference to the page number where the skill is described.

SKILLS BY CATEGORY

Agility Skills

Easy - Balance, Boat, Breakfall, Climb, Dance (Culture), Jump, March, Run

Medium - Ride (Species), Sail

Hard - Acrobatics (Jump, Balance, Climb, Breakfall), Dodge, Maneuver

Another good list and breakdown.



Communications Skills

Easy - Beg, Bribe, Converse, Etiquette [Culture], Intimidate, Sing, Speak Language <Own, Easy>

Medium - Courtesan, Debate, Fast Talk, Interrogate {Intimidate, Converse},

Orate, Speak Language <Medium>

Hard - Act (Fast Talk, Orate, Mimic), Bargain (Bribe, Fast Talk, Debate),

Speak Language <Hard>

Knowledge Skills

Easy - Battle, Craft <Easy>, First Aid, Lore <Easy>, Mimic,

Read/Write <Easy>, Survival (Terrain), Ventriloquism

Medium - Administrate (Bribe), Craft <Medium>, Evaluate, Instruct,

Lore <Medium>, Memorize, Read/Write <Medium>, Shiphandling,

Treat Disease, Treat Poison,

Hard - Craft <Hard>, Intrigue (Act, Bribe, Conversation),

Lore <Hard>, Martial Arts

Magic Skills

Easy - Sorcery Spells <Easy>

Medium - Ceremony, Sorcery Spells <Medium>

Hard - Enchant, Sorcery Skills, Sorcery Spells <Hard>, Spirit Combat,

Spirit Travel, Summon

Very Hard - Sorcery Spells <Very Hard>

Manipulation Skills

Easy - Catch, Drive [Various], Fast Draw [Weapon], Juggle, Pick Locks,

Pickpocket, Play <Easy>, Set Traps, Swim

Medium - Conceal, Disarm Traps (Set Traps), Escape, Play <Medium>,

Sleight {Pickpocket, Juggle}, Throw, Torture

Hard - Devise {Pick Locks, Set Traps, Disarm Traps}, Play <Hard>

Perception

Easy - Scan, Scout (Terrain)

Medium - Listen, Search, Track

Hard - Feel, Lip Read, Smell, Spirit Sense, Taste

Stealth

Easy - Hide

Medium - Shadow (Hide), Sneak

{} = The skill encompasses these skills. These skills can be used at

the same percentage as the base skill.

() = Related skills which default to half the percentage

of the base skill.

[] = The skill has several unrelated categories. Unrelated categories

do not default to half the percentage of the base skill. In some cases, such as skill may have related and unrelated categories,

in which case the related categories will default to each other

at half the percentage of the base skill.

Attack

Easy - Club, Crossbow, Dagger, Dropped Rock, Fist, Shortsword, 2H Spear,

Thrown Rock, Tools

Medium - All Others

Hard - Atlatl, Boomerang, Engines, 1H Flail, 2H Flail, Off Hand Weapons,

Martial Throw, Martial Hold, Whip

Parry

Easy - Shield, 2H Spear, Staff

Medium - All Others

Hard - 1H Axe, 1H Flail, 2H Flail, 1H Hammer, 2H Hammer, Kick, 1H Mace,

Maul, Off Hand Weapons

Attack and Parry skill will specialize in a single weapon in that category, i.e., Broadsword out of 1H Sword. They default to all others in a category at half percentage, but a default weapon in that category can be studied up to the level of the specialized weapon at half the normal study times.

All 1H Swinging, 1H Thrusting, 2H Swinging and 2H Thrusting attack and parry skills default to other weapons of that type at half percentage, but these defaults must be studied to higher levels at the normal study times.

Again, good charts and useful. Well done here.

SKILL DEFINITIONS

AGILITY SKILLS:

Acrobatics (Breakfall, Balance, Jump, Climb) (0%) Hard

The skill of tumbling and gymnastics. It can be used to

entertain, or in combat to flip or move to another position

in an unexpected manner, and may be substituted for Dodge

skill of no other actions are attempted. A successful

Acrobatics roll allows a character to regain a standing

position from a fall without having to waste an extra

action to stand.

Balance (5%) Easy

The skill of maintaining one's balance and equilibrium under

adverse conditions. The skill can be used to maintain one's

balance on a narrow ledge or rope, or can be substituted for

a DEX roll in situations where one needs to maintain one's balance, such as running across broken terrain or not

falling when sustaining knockback damage.

Breakfall (0%) Easy

The skill of absorbing and redirecting the force of the impact

from a fall. A successful Breakfall roll will reduce falling

damage by 1d6, a special success reduces falling damage by 2d6,

and a critical success will halve the amount of any excess damage

inflicted.

Any successful Breakfall roll allows a character to

specify the hit locations to sustain any excess damage.

A successful Breakfall roll additionally allows a character to regain

a standing or kneeling position from a fall without having to waste

an extra action to stand or kneel.

Dance (Culture) (5%) Easy

The ability to make the right movements and gestures with or without

noise or music according to the accepted standards of the dance. This

skill is culturally oriented, but defaults across almost all

cultures.

Some cultural divisions - Hsunchen, Pelorian, Pentan, Praxian,

Teshnan, Theyalan, Vithelan, Western, Street, Troll, Elf

Maneuver (25%) Hard

This skill governs movement in melee situations. It is normally

studied by warriors, martial artists or duelists. It covers the

art of combat movement, engaging, disengaging and closing. In

any Move Phase where two or more characters disagree about their

state of engagement or their fighting distance, they should

each roll Maneuver skill.

If they achieve the same level of

success (that is, both fumble, both fail, both succeed, both

special or both critical), nothing changes. If one character

achieves a higher level of success than the other (succeeds where

the other fails, specials where the other succeeds, etc.),

he or she acts as if disengaged, with the loser remaining engaged.

For more details, see Combat.

March (5%) Easy

The ability to move long distances on foot efficiently.

A successful March roll can decrease long term fatigue

loss from extended movement. See fatigue rules for details.



Run (5%) Easy

The ability to move rapidly on foot. A character's non combat running

rate is increased by half the Run skill, expressed as a precentage,

and the character can make a Run roll to avoid short term loss of

fatigue due to continued running.

For example, a character with 54%

run skill would run at 126% their normal non combat running rate,

and could make a Run roll every five melee rounds to avoid short

term fatigue loss from running. The skill has no effect on long

term fatigue loss.

This is the sort of thing that March needs as well.

Sail (0%) Medium

The ability to handle a wind propelled craft. Boat is a complementary

skill.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS:

Act (Fast Talk, Orate, Mimic) (5%) Hard

The ability to convincingly portray another. It can be used for

purposes of entertainment or disguise, and includes both verbal

and non-verbal components.

Bargain (Bribe, Fast Talk, Debate) (5%) Hard

This is the skill of trade and barter. The skill can be used to buy

something for a lower price than is asked. To use it, one must be in

a position where bargaining is reasonable; bargaining for the sacred

axe of a Babeester Gor temple guard is not feasible. The bargainer

must state the price at which he or she wishes to purchase an item,

and for each 2% difference in between that price and the asking price,

must subtract 1% from a Bargain skill roll.

In any case, the person

selling the item will almost never take a loss, no matter how well

they are bargained with. As a result, the best bargain one can achieve

is typically the price at which the item was originally purchased by

the seller. If a bargaining attempt fails, the user may increase the

offer and try again. While I've watched people bargain others into taking losses, I agree that it is an important game limit not to allow losses. In this case, "realism" requires not allowing a real (but very, very rare) outcome.

Example: Hilarian the merchant wishes to purchase an ornate helmet.

The owner purchased the helmet for 200 guilders, and is asking 400

guilders for it. Hilarian has a Bargain skill of 60%, and offers

240 guilders for it, or 60% of the asking price. The difference in

price is 40%, so 20% is subtracted from his Bargain skill, so

his chance for success is only 40%.

Hilarian rolls a 49 and fails.

He tries again, offering 280 guilders, or 70% of the asking price.

This time only 15% is subtracted from his Bargain skill, so his

chance for success is 45%. This time Hilarian rolls a 20 and succeeds.



Beg (5%) Easy

The ability to wheedle and whine successfully enough, using

appropriate guilt-inducing buzz words, to prey successfully

upon passers by. The skill includes panhandling.

Bribe (5%) Easy

The ability to offer money or other gifts to someone without

blatant offense to the person or their customs. A special

success with the skill will tell the potential briber beforehand

how receptive the proposed recipient of a bribe will be, including

whether the proposed recipient would be offended no matter how

nicely the words are couched or presented. A critical success allows

for bribing without the recipient realizing that he or she has

been bribed. Etiquette [Culture] is a complementary skill.

Converse (10%) Easy

The ability to lead a pleasant and interesting discussion.

The skill can be used to gather information, but is unlikely

to bring anything to the surface that a party would prefer

kept private.

Courtesan (10%) Medium

Courtesans are skilled professionals whose tools and media are human

bodies. This skill encompasses the myriad techniques of love. It includes

the fine points of verbal enticement, coercive seduction, titillating

entertainment, tasteful foreplay, subtle manipulation, erotic carnality,

exuberant climax and satisfying afterplay*. Increased competency in the

skill indicates increased finesse.

*This particular clause is functionally duplicative of erotic carnality. I guess the question is whether the description is worth the possible hassle (which will come anyway).

Debate (5%) Medium

The ability to intellectually convince a neutral party that the

debater's point of view is correct. The listener may still deny

it emotionally, but will admit that the successful debater sounds

right. It is possible to debate an individual to try to convince

him or her of something. The effects this can have should not

go beyond what a referee considers reasonable. If a character in jail

makes a successful Debate roll, the guard will be impressed with

his reasoning, but is unlikely to let the character go.

Well defined!

Etiquette [Culture] (0%) Easy

Knowledge of the manners and acceptable behavior for a specific culture.

A skill level of at least 15% will prevent grotesque social errors,

a skill level of 31% or greater indicates familiarity with that

culture's social customs (as per the language proficiency table).

The skills only default within very similar cultures.

A Praxian

nomad might be able to use half his Etiquette (Praxian) with

a Pentan nomad, but his Etiquette (Praxian) would be useless

in the Pelorian Heartland. Etiquette (Street) is also known

as Streetwise, and is the knowledge of urban low culture.

Some cultural divisions - Hsunchen, Pelorian, Pentan, Praxian,

Teshnan, Theyalan, Vithelan, Western, Street, Troll, Elf

Interrogate {Intimidate, Converse} (5%) Medium

The skill of extracting information by questioning. The skill

encompasses verbal techniques. Torture is the purely physical aspect

of questioning. The two skills are complementary.

Intimidate (5%) Easy

The ability to instill fear and obedience in others through

intimidation. The skill has little effect on targets that do

not believe the user has a credible threat, but is quite

effective with a cowardly or demoralized target. If the target

doubts the credibility of the threat, a violent reaction or

attempt to harm the skill user at an opportune moment is likely.

Sing (5%) Easy

The ability to make one's voice carry a tune according to the

standards of rhythm, rhyme, pitch, harmony, etc., as needed for

the song.

KNOWLEDGE SKILLS:

Administrate (5%) Medium

The ability to coordinate the many different facets needed to run an

organization in a businesslike manner. The level of skill will reflect

the general efficiency of a leader that runs an organization larger

than a warband.

Battle (5%) Easy

The skill of knowing what to do in a battlefield situation. It defines

the savvy and behavior of the character during a fighting period that

involves many people. Individual prowess and morale are lost in mass

action, and even the boldest Rune Lord who has never been in a mass

action may fail to recognize these signs and take the proper actions.

The appalling truth of these fights is that one is likely to die through

no fault of their own, especially if he knows not what to do. Battle skill

may be trained or researched only to a limit of 50%. Anything past that

is gained only through experience.

Very true.

When a mass engagement occurs that the character is involved in,

roll 1d100 and compare the result to the character's Battle skill. On a

critical success, the character fought heroically, and will gain 1d6%

(or 1d2+2%) in Battle skill, and receives four experience checks to be

distributed amongst weapon or battlefield skills and a POW gain roll.

On a special success, the character fought well, and receives a Battle

skill experience check, two experience checks to be distributed amongst

weapon or battlefield skills and a POW gain roll. On a success, the

character fought competently, and receives a Battle skill experience

check and an experience check to be used with a weapon or battlefield

skill.

On a failure, the character saw action, and receives a Battle

skill experience check. On a special failure (the inverse of a special

success), the character fought poorly and was wounded, and receives a

Battle skill experience check. On a fumble, the character was killed.

Depending on the situation and the cults he or she belonged to, a slain

character might be able to use Divine Intervention to survive, or might

be Resurrected after the battle.

Some battles may have special modifiers added or subtracted from the

Battle roll, reflecting battles that particularly favor or disfavor

one side. A particularly lethal battle might have a percentage added

to the die rolls of both sides. These modifiers will not adjust a

natural roll of 01 or 00. Other die rolls adjusted to below 01 or

above 100 should be treated as rolls of 01 or 00, respectively.

For example, the Building Wall battle was a major Lunar defeat and a

major Pharonic victory. All characters on the Lunar side of the battle

would have a +40% added to their Battle rolls, resulting in at least a

40% chance of death for anyone on the Lunar side. All characters on the

Pharonic side have a -10% subtracted from their Battle rolls, meaning

that only a character that rolled a natural 00 would die.

Craft [Various] (0-10%) Easy, Medium or Hard

Various craft skills, some unrelated, some related. Some examples:

Easy - Basketweaving (5%), Baking (5%), Butchery (10%), Cooking (10%),

Candlemaking (5%), Map Making (10%), Prepare Corpse (10%)

Medium - Armorer (5%), Bowyer (5%), Fletcher (5%)

Hard - Artificer (5%), Disguise (5%), Blade Venom (0%), Acid (0%),

Blade Venom Antidote (0%)

Instruct (5%) Medium

The skill of teaching. For a training session in a skill to succeed, the

teacher must roll under his or her Instruct skill. If the Instruct roll

fails, the training session counts as a research session. A fumbled

Instruct roll results in the loss of 1d6% from the training session.

A special Instruct roll results in a gain of at least 3% (reroll results

below 3%) from the training session, and a critical Instruct roll results

in a gain of 6% from the training session.

A teacher may not teach someone

in a skill past their level in the skill, level of Instruct skill

notwithstanding. Successful training above 75% in most skills counts as

research, successful training above 100% in knowledge skill that cannot

be raised by experience counts as research, with failed training sessions

yielding no results.

A single instructor can typically train up to 16 students at a time

in a skill up to 25%, 8 students at a time up to 50%, 4 students at

a time up to 75%, and 1 or 2 students at a time over 75%.

Of course this means that most graduate schools in the United States are not teaching anyof the students past 75% and most not past 50%... I would bumpt the limits so that 32 students to 25% ... 4 students 75% to 95% and one or two students beyond 95%.



Intrigue (Act, Bribe, Converse) (5%) Hard

The ability to gather sensitive information by indirect means,

and apply such information to its best advantage. The skill is

of great use to social climbers or those that are active in almost

any form of politics.

Lore [Various] (0-5%) Easy, Medium and Hard

Various knowledge and lore skills, some unrelated, some related.

Generally, the more a lore encompasses, the more difficult the skill.

Some examples:

Easy - Cult Lore (0%), Lock Lore (0%)

Medium - Sartar Lore (0%, 10% if Sartar native), Spirit Lore (5%)

Hard - Glorantha Lore (Age%)

Martial Arts (0%) Hard

This skill makes the best use of natural weapons. It is a discipline

of the mind that allows a character to double the damage or effect

of a natural weapon. This has no effect on damage bonus.

Using Martial

Arts, an adventurer's player must roll a successful attack or parry

with a natural weapon. If the percentile roll is also equal to or

under the adventurer's Martial Arts skill, then the adventurer gets

the benefit of two damage rolls for the natural weapon or unarmed

combat skill (i.e., Fist, Kick, Jumping Kick, Grapple or Martial Hold

damage attempt, etc.).

Martial Arts also affects an adventurer's

natural weapons parry. A successful fist, kick or grapple parry roll

that is also less than or equal to the Martial Arts percentage blocks

6 points of damage and the defender may take excess damage at that

location at the rolled hit location, at the defender's option.

A Grapple attack that is also less than or equal to the Martial Arts

percentage that is parried by an opponent's weapon or shield may

grasp the opponent's weapon or shield arm instead of the weapon or

shield. A Grapple or Martial Hold immobilization attempt that rolls

equal to or less than the Martial Arts percentage has a double chance

of success.

A Grapple throw or Martial Throw attempt that is also equal

to or less than the Martial Arts percentage will have a double chance of

success or do double damage, at the thrower's option. A Grapple or

Martial Hold damage attempt that is also under the Martial Arts

percentage will do double damage.

My favorite alternative to this set of Martial Arts rules is to allow a successful Martial Arts roll (either as a separate roll or rolling the to hit roll under both the skill and the weapon) to allow the addition of DEX to the STR+SIZ totals for the damage bonus with a weapon. Thus one would learn Martial Arts Fist and instead of (frex) a 30 to determine the STR+SIZ bonus (for a STR and SIZ of 15 each) one might use 45 (adding in a DEX of 15). The damage bonus would be 2d6 rather than d4.

Martial Arts of this type would be learned for individual weapons as a Skill two degrees harder than the base skilland could not exceed the skill for the weapon learned separately.

Thus one would learn both sword and martial sword. There would be lots and lots of different martial arts.

The appropriate magic rune spell is Ki which allows a character to also add POW to the damage bonus numbers -- again limited by the Martial Skill.

Note that my approach dovetails with a trained grapple (e.g. Greco-Roman Wrestling, JuJitsu, etc.) set of rules where the damage done on a throw is related to the damage bonus more than any direct "dice size" assigned to throw damage.

Memorize (5%) Medium

The ability to remember something exactly by rote, even if

incomprehensible. The skill can be used to substitute for an

INT roll whenever trying to remember something one has seen

or heard. The skill is often studied by heralds, messengers,

lawspeakers, etc.

Mimic (5%) Easy

The ability to use one's voice to imitate sounds and other's voices.

The greater the success, the more convincing the imitation.

Survival (Terrain) (5%) Easy

The ability to find food, water and shelter in varying types of

terrain. Survival (Urban) is a skill known by beggars or the

homeless.

Terrain types - Desert/Plains, Woods/Jungle, Marsh, Mountain, Broken,

Rough, Arctic, Urban

Treat Disease (5%) Medium

Successful use of this skill doubles a victim's chance of success

at his or her next disease recovery CON roll. A critical success

triples the next chance of success, a fumble halves the next chance

of success. Victims of acute, terminal or serious diseases must be

tended to constantly to get this bonus. Victims of mild diseases need

only be tended for one day per week.

Treat Poison (5%) Medium

Successful use of this skill purges the victim of 2d6 POT of poison,

a special roll purges 4d6 POT, a critical success purges all of the

poison. A fumble halves the victim's chance of resisting the poison.

The skill attempt must be begun before damage has been taken. A skill

roll can be attempted only once per poisoning.

Ventriloquism (0%) Easy

The ability to make one's voice seem to come from someplace other

than the speaker. Normal range for throwing one's voice is the

normal range for spoken voice.

MANIPULATION SKILLS:

Disarm Traps (Set Traps) (5%) Medium

The skill of deactivating and disassembling traps. This skill

(or Set Traps, whichever is higher) is complementary to perception

skills used for the purposes of detecting traps.

Drive [Various] (5%) Easy

The ability to drive a vehicle. Some driving skills are related, and would share defaults, others are not. Typical vehicles include

chariots, oxcarts, and wagons.

Escape (5%) Medium

The ability to free oneself from restraining ropes, chains, manacles,

etc. An initial roll to position oneself so that the restrains are

applied ineffectively should be made once the bonds are applied.

At that point, the character can attempt to free him or herself

once a turn with another successful Escape roll.

A critical

success on the initial Escape roll means that the bonds were

so poorly applied that the character can escape at any time without

having to spend a turn working or making a second Escape roll. If

the initial Escape roll did not succeed, or the character was unable

to perform one (i.e., was unconscious at the time), a single Escape roll

at half skill may be made after a turn's work. If this roll fails,

further attempts will not succeed.

The difficulty of Escape as a skill depends on the technical sophistication of the bonds used. In this respect it is similar to the discernment of hidden panels and doors.

Fast Draw [Weapon] (0%) Easy

The skill of drawing a weapon and attacking or parrying with it in one

motion. It can also be studied for missile weapons, allowing one to

draw a missile, load and fire in one motion. The skill must be

studied separately for different weapon categories, which on

occasion can overlap somewhat (half skill), but generally do not.

On a successful Fast Draw skill roll, a character can draw a melee

weapon and attack or parry with it at its normal SR in a single melee

action. If used with a missile weapon, on a successful roll the character

can draw, load and fire a missile in one action, adding 3 SR to the

normal SR of the missile weapon (it still requires DEX SR to fire).

If the roll is failed, only the regular Draw Weapon melee action takes

place, no attack or parry can be combined with it. A fumbled roll

drops the weapon 0-3 meters (1d4-1) away in a random direction. A

critical success with a melee weapon adds +20% to the attack or parry

with the weapon (the opponent is surprised). A critical success with a

missile weapon allows the character to draw, load and fire the missile

weapon at DEX SR.

Assuming that Quick Draw will not be taken purely to allow faster reloading of missile weapons...

Pick Locks (5%) Easy

The skill of defeating a lock with tools, but without the benefit

of a key. If the model of lock is not known (Lock Lore or

Artificer Craft roll), halve the chance of success. A single

attempt will typically take from 1 melee round to one turn,

depending on the complexity of the lock.

If the initial attempt

fails, a second attempt can be made at -25%, then a third at

-50%, etc. A fumble will jam the lock, and no further attempts

can succeed. Simple locks may add to the chance for success,

complex locks may subtract from the chance of success. A set

of lockpicks allows for a normal chance of success.

If using

improvised tools (metal scraps, wire, a piece of a buckle,

dagger, etc.), halve the chances of success. If only crude

tools are available (twigs, tools of improper size, etc.),

chances for success are reduced to one-fourth normal.

This is a good place for adding my modular addition to skill systems. Lock picking is one of the few areas where that level of complexity is necessary.

Pickpocket (5%) Easy

The ability to pick pockets, cut purses, and otherwise relieve

a victim of small valuables without being noticed.

Set Traps (5%) Easy

The ability to set simple traps, be they snares, deadfalls,

pitfalls or tripwires. More complex traps would also require use

of the Devise and/or Artificer Craft skills. This skill (or

Disarm Traps, whichever is higher) is complementary to

perception skills used for the purposes of detecting traps.

PERCEPTION SKILLS:

Feel (5%) Hard

The ability to discern and identify something by touch alone.

The skill can be complementary to Search, when using touch

as well as sight to search.

Lip Read (0%) Hard

The ability to understand a spoken language through observation of

lips, teeth and tongue. If the target has a moustache subtract 5%,

for a beard subtract 10% to 50%, depending on how full and

concealing it is. Attempting to use this skill on a different

species, such as human using the skill on a troll, is at best

at half skill. A character's effective Lip Read skill can never be

higher than the character's knowledge of the language being spoken.

Scout (Terrain) (30%) Easy

The ability to cross, view and analyze terrain. Base Scout skill

is based on one's native terrain, defaulting to other terrains

at half that value. Mounted nomads will typically have

Scout (Plains) skill, city-bred thieves will have Scout (Urban)

skill, etc.

A successful Scout roll indicates that the

character managed to move about the terrain in an efficient

manner and can find the easiest pathways, good hiding places,

water holes, or other appropriate local landmarks. In a city,

a successful Scout (Urban) roll will tell where the good and

bad parts of town are, where the markets are, and most

important public places.

Terrain types - Desert/Plains, Woods/Jungle, Marsh, Mountain, Broken,

Rough, Arctic, Urban

Smell (5%) Hard

The ability to discern, differentiate between, and identify things

using one's sense of smell.

Spirit Sense (25%) Hard

The ability to sense discorporate spirits, with or without the use

of magic. Training in Spirit Sense is normally only

available to Assistant Shamans, Shamans or members of

certain cults. See Magic Book for details.

Taste (5%) Hard

The ability to discern, differentiate between, and identify things

using one's sense of smell. It can be used to detect poisons in

food or drink as well.

STEALTH SKILLS:

Shadow (Hide) (5%) Medium

The art of secretly following someone around in a town or city.

It should not be used in an unpopulated setting, Hide skill should

be used instead. A success with this skill means that the character

has managed to follow his or her target unnoticed. A failure means

that the target has realized that they are being followed, and if

they are in any way alert, a successful Scan roll will identify the

follower. A fumbled roll immediately identifies the follower to the

target.

Depending on the alertness of the target, another Shadow roll

should be made after the initial roll as frequently as once a turn,

or as infrequently as once an hour (or less).

If the target is actively

watching for a shadow, they can make a Scan roll every turn to

identify the follower, but if the follower succeeded in their Shadow

roll, subtract the followers Shadow skill from the target's Scan skill.

If the Scan roll is equal to or less than Scan skill less half the

followers Shadow skill, the target suspects they are being followed,

but is not able to specifically identify the follower(s).

ATTACK SKILLS:

Jumping Kick (0%) Medium

This form of natural weapon attack does 1d8 damage and double

the normal amount of knockback, but counts as two actions

(i.e., no defenses are allowed when this attack is used).

This can represent another form of all out attack, in which case

another descriptive name should be used.

Good point. Most jump kicks are either flash with no actual difference in impact or all out attack versions of kicking.

The third kind of jumping kick is a form of manuever and intended to cover distance.

In any case, jump kicks seem to be subsumed in the other rules.



Martial Hold (0%) Hard

May be used immediately after a successful Grapple attack to

inflict damage or immobilize an opponent. Acts as a normal

immobilization or does 1d4 damage plus damage bonus, ignoring

any articulated armor (i.e., most armor does not count).

Protective spells will count. May be used as a come-along hold,

inflicting pain, but no actual damage unless the opponent attempts

to break free.

Martial Throw (0%) Hard

A Martial Throw may be attempted immediately after a successful

Grapple attack (in the same melee round), throwing at normal

chance of success and damage.

COMPOSITE SKILLS

Composite skills are skills that subsume one or more skills.

These skills are known at the same percentage as the base skill,

and if the base skill increases, they will increase correspondingly.

The skills a composite skill encompasses are generally bracketed,

i.e., Interrogate {Intimidate, Converse}. Composite skills are almost

always Medium or Hard skills.

SKILLS WITH DEFAULTS

Some skills have defaults, related skills that are known at

half the percentage of the base skill. If the base skill

increases, they will increase correspondingly. Skills that have

such defaults are almost always Medium or Hard skills.

Related

skills or categories that a skill defaults to are generally set

off by parentheses, i.e., Ride (Species) or by brackets, i.e.,

Drive [Vehicle], although skills with brackets generally also

contain several unrelated categories which do not default to half

the percentage of the base skill (any related categories will still

default to each other at half the percentage of the base skill).

SKILL SUCCESS AND FAILURE

To add color to the use of non combat skills, the following guidelines

can be used by gamemasters and players:

Missing a skill roll by 10% or less is not a serious failure,

missing a skill roll by more than 10% is a more serious failure,

and fumbling a skill roll is catastrophic.

Likewise, succeeding in a skill roll by 10% or less is a simple success,

succeeding in a skill roll by more than 10% is a particularly good

success, a special success is an extremely good success, and a critical

success is a spectacular success.

Gamemasters that wish to go to the trouble can use a 'special failure'

result, the inverse of a special success. The special failure chance

is calculated by taking one fifth of the character's chance of missing

the roll and subtracting from 101. If the character rolls equal to

or higher to that number, the results are very poor, just short of

a fumble (which is even more catastrophic).

For example, a character

with a 70% Battle skill has a 30% chance of missing his or her roll.

30/5 is 6, so the character has a 6% special failure chance. 101-6 is 95,

so if the character rolls 95 or more, he or she will get a special failure

result. Of course, if he or she rolls 99 or 00, it will be a fumble instead.

Gamemasters are also encouraged to define and use skill modifiers based on

the specific situation a character is in and the player's roleplaying in

the situation. For instance, if in a scenario the party needs to

convince Asylius, a Lunar official, to let them have a weapons permit,

have one of them make a Oratory, Debate or Fast Talk roll, with the

following modifiers: from -20% to +20% for roleplaying (-20% for no

attempt to roleplay, -10% for bad roleplaying, 0% for average roleplaying,

+20% for good roleplaying); +10% if they mention their mutual friend,

Theodorus; +5% if they praise Asylius (he is vain); -10% if they insult

him, even subtly (he is quite sharp).

Bribery attempts on Asylius use the

above modifiers, but with an additional -20% modifier, as Asylius is

relatively honest. Intimidate attempts are not likely to succeed, as

Asylius will have a hard time believing any threats the characters make,

most likely calling for the guards in response.

COMPLEMENTARY SKILLS

Good idea. This group of sections might well go in front of the skill descriptions rather than behind them.

In a task where one skill is obviously the most appropriate, and yet

there is another skill that could help, add one fifth (the special chance)

of the less relevant skill to the first skill to determine success.

For example, Achmed the Armorer is a master armorer with

Craft/Armory 95% and Bargain 41%. When selling armor in his shop

(using Bargain), his Bargain skill would have 1/5 his Craft/Armory

skill added to it, or 41% + 95%/5 = 60% Bargain. If however, he

was asked to take over a friend's fruit stand for a little while,

Achmed would use only his Bargain 41% skill (Achmed knows next to

nothing about fruit).

AVAILABILITY OF SKILL TRAINING

A number of skills are not commonly taught or are considered socially

unacceptable in a number of cultures. These are skills in which training

may be difficult or impossible to find. They are listed as having

'Rare' training availability in the skills list. Some possible sources

for training in these rare skills are:

Thieves - skills generally taught only by thieves and Thief Cults:

Shadow, Taste, Feel, Smell, Touch, Lip Reading, Scout(Urban),

Search, Escape, Pick Locks, Pick Pockets, Set Traps, Disarm

Traps, Lock Lore, Conceal, Intimidate, Mimic, Ventriloquism,

Act, Climb, Acrobatics, Interrogate, Fast Talk, Bribe, Dodge,

Disguise Craft, Balance, Jump, Bribe, Etiquette (Street),

Speak Thieves' Argot, Read/Write Thieves' Argot

Players - skills generally taught only by Players, tricksters and their cults:

Lip Reading, Conceal, Sleight, Pick Pockets, Juggle,

Mimic, Ventriloquism, Act, Acrobatics, Breakfall, Dodge, Disguise

Craft, Balance

Military - skills generally taught only in some military units and cults:

Battle, Some exotic weapons, both Attack and Parry, Interrogation,

Intimidate, Dodge, March, Etiquette (Military), Fast Draw, Maneuver

Sages - skills generally taught by sages, alchemists and Knowledge cults:

Exotic languages, both Read/Write and Speak, Devise, Alchemical Skills,

Exotic Lores, Etiquette, Administrate, Instruct

Craft - skills only taught by crafters, Craft guilds and certain cults:

Devise and exotic Craft skills.

Unususal - rare skills, often only taught only in specific cultures

or certain areas of the world, or only to certain people:

Exotic weapons, both Attack and Parry, Martial Arts, Martial Throw,

Martial Hold, Kick Attack and Parry, Jumping Kick, Magic Skills,

Sorcery, Spirit Combat, Spirit Sense, Spirit Travel.

Page 74:

SPEAK OWN LANGUAGE

Replace Speak Own Language (30) with Speak Own Language (INTx4)

Remove the first three sentences of the first paragraph.



Page 74:

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY TABLE

Replace second sentence of third paragraph (31-50) with:

One can speak as well or better than a stupid native, and get

most ideas across.

NEW SKILLS

If gamemasters and players feel a need for additional skills, they should by all means define them, though one should be careful not to go too far introducing new skills, as this adds unnecessary complexity to the game. The current skill list, as well as some common sense and reality checking, should be used to create and categorize new skills, both in terms of category and level of difficulty. Some very rare and exotic skills or sorcery spells could be Very Hard skills, requiring twice the time of a Hard skill to train or research.

Some new skills might best be described as composite skills, skills that subsume one or more other skills. Again, common sense should be used in creating and categorizing these skills, and determining whether they would simplify or complicate things. As a rough rule of thumb, a composite skill that allows a character to do what two Easy skills do would be a Medium skill, one that encompasses four Easy or two Medium skills, would be a Hard skill, etc.

If the skill also has other benefits, the benefits should count as one

or more Easy skill for determining the new skills difficulty.

An example might be a Donandar cultist that wishes to study a skill that lets him jump, fall and roll around, but lacks the sophistication of Acrobatics. After some discussion between the gamemaster and the player, they decide that this skill would basically consist of Jump and Breakfall, with no significant additional benefits. The skill could be called Tumble, and would be a Medium difficulty skill (it is a composite of two Easy skills).

The gamemaster would have to determine training and availability, but players and thieves would be two logical sources of training for such a skill. Of course, the character could always attempt to research such a skill on his or her own, a long, and in this case possibly painful process.

SKILL DECAY

Skills that are not used and practiced will decay. As as rule of thumb, if a character does not spend at least a number of minutes a month equal to the skill's percentage practicing, using, training or researching a skill, it will decay by 1%.

This makes a good optional rule

For example, a character with 90% Broadsword needs to spend at least

90 minutes a month (15 minutes a week) practicing the skill, or it

will drop to 89%.



Page 81:

EXPOSURE, HUNGER AND THIRST, replace with:

Exposure, hunger and thirst can all cause losses of long term fatigue levels. Generally, each full day without liquid or every two full days without food will cause a loss of a single level of long term fatigue. Characters going beyond the level of Incapacitated will begin to suffer general hit point damage, typically 1d3 per day without food, 2d6 per day without water.

Page 81:

WASTING DISEASE, replace with:

Wasting Disease: Muscles atrophy. Affects STR. When a character's STR reaches 0, he or she cannot move.

Page 81:

DISEASE, Add:

Milder diseases exist, typically causing temporary loss of characteristic points or the loss of long term fatigue. Some examples:

Fever: Each degree of illness causes a corresponding loss in levels

of long term fatigue. An Incapacitated character is bedridden.

Runs: Causes temporary loss of STR, which is recovered once the character

recovers. A character whose STR reaches 0 is bedridden.

Page 82:

AGING AND INACTION, correction:

Characters will only die if their CON is reduced to zero. See Disease for the effect of reducing other characteristics to zero.

Page 83:

MOVEMENT, replace with:

A character trying to move in a wind with strength greater than the character's STR + SIZ will have some difficulty. If the character tries a complex maneuver or tries to move quickly, a DEX roll, typically DEX x 5, is required for the character to remain standing. A wind with strength greater than twice the characters STR + SIZ can knock characters down or possibly carry them away. A failed DEX x 3 roll will result in the character being knocked down, or possibly carried away.

Page 83:

WIND MEASUREMENT TABLE, correction:

Remove comments following Light, Moderate, or Strong Wind and Fresh Gale.

RQIV MAGIC BOOK

Page 7:

THE PLANES, add:

The Spirit Plane

The spirit world is contiguous with every point of the mundane world, but is normally invisible to the mundane world, and vice versa. Some spells and abilities allow spirits and embodied creatures to look across the boundary. The view is much like looking at something under murky water - hard to see and harder to locate.

When the spirit plane is looked upon by a magic spell that lets one view it, such as Second Sight or by the innate Second Sight ability of a shaman or another with a special relation with the spirit world, it appears as an additional layer on reality,a dreamlike place where forms come and go. A discorporate spirit sees the spirit world more clearly, but still needs to peer about

to find other spirits. A discorporate spirit that becomes Visible "sticks its head out of the water," to use a shaman's figure of speech. It can see the mundane world better, but cannot see the spirit world as well.

A man on the mundane world looks out onto a meadow with an old tree that is said to be haunted. He can see a meadow with a tree.

A spell or a shaman's Second Sight would allow him to see not the spirits of living things, embodied spirits, in the mundane world, but to see beyond the mundane world, and see the spirits of the spirit world. If he looked out onto the same meadow with Second Sight, he would not only see the meadow and the tree, but also the spirits of the grass and the spirit of the tree. He could also see into the spirit plane, and might be able to see the ghost that haunts the tree.

The ghost is a native of the spirit plane, though it likely was once a creature of the mundane world. It can normally only see and interact with the disembodied spirits native to the spirit world. Unless the ghost has uses its innate power of Visibility or the spirit magic to use Second Sight, it cannot see the man or his world. If uses these abilities, it can now see onto the mundane world much as a man with Second Sight or a shaman can see onto its world.

A discorporate shaman is in the same situation as the ghost. Unless he uses his Second Sight, he can no longer see the mundane world or the spirits of the living, though he would see disembodied spirits such as ghosts or spell spirits.



SPIRIT SENSE

Spirit Sense lets an embodied character sense a spirit in the vicinity. It also lets a disembodied character sense an embodied or disembodied spirit. More powerful spirits are easier to see, so add the POW of the spirit to be spotted to the character's Spirit Sense skill. A fetch is visible on the spirit plane like any disembodied spirit.

Spirit Sense can work with one's normal senses, but it helps to have a magical perception spell (Second Sight, Soul Sight, or Mystic Vision) or a shaman's Second Sight ability. An embodied character cannot use this skill to Sense another embodied spirit, such as another living creature or a bound spirit. An embodied creature cannot Sense through an opaque barrier.

Spirit Sense is a Hard Perception skill with a base of 25%, which can go up by experience. Training in Spirit Sense is normally only available to Assistant Shamans, Shamans or members of certain cults. Shamans have no maximum in this perception skill.



Embodied Characters Looking for Visible Spirits:

If a spirit is Visible but out of spell range, or the character lacks a magical perception spell, the character sees the spirit on a success with Scan. If a Visible spirit comes within a character's POW x 5 in meters, he or she can sense the presence of the spirit with a successful Spirit Sense roll. Within the character's POW in meters, he or she senses the presence of a Visible spirit without a roll.

If a spirit is Visible and within spell range, a character with a magical perception spell sees it without a roll.

Embodied Characters Looking for Non-Visible Spirits:

An embodied character without a magical perception spell can Sense a non-visible spirit within his or her POW in meters only on a special success in Spirit Sense, which will tell the character that there is a spirit nearby, but not know where or what kind. A critical success will tell the character the exact location of the spirit.

An embodied character with a magical perception spell can Sense a non-visible spirit within spell range on a successful Spirit Sense roll.

Disembodied Spirits Looking for Embodied Creatures:

A disembodied, non-visible spirit without a magical perception spell or ability can only Sense an embodied creature if it passes within its POW in meters, and then only on a special success in Spirit Sense.

If a disembodied spirit uses Visibility, it can sense embodied spirits within its POW x 5 in meters with a successful Spirit Sense roll, and will sense embodied spirits within its POW x 1 in meters automatically. A Visible spirit cannot Sense through an opaque barrier.

If a disembodied spirit has a magical perception spell or ability, it can sense embodied creatures within spell range on a successful Spirit Sense roll.

Disembodied Spirits on the Spirit Plane:

A non-visible spirit can Sense another non-visible spirit automatically at a range of the larger spirit's POW x 5 in meters. It can Sense another spirit at a range of its own POW x 10 in meters on a successful Spirit Sense roll.

A Visible spirit can Sense another spirit (visible or non-visible) without a roll at a range of its POW in meters. It can Sense another spirit at a range of the larger spirit's POW x 5 in meters on a successful Spirit Sense roll.

Roll once for each spirit at the beginning of each melee round.

Miscellaneous Rules:

If a disembodied spirit is trying to Sense a shaman, add one to its level of success. (A failure = a success, a success = a special, a special = a critical, a critical = a critical and the spirit gets a free attack on the shaman unless the shaman is aware of it.) The shamans fetch makes him or her fairly obvious to spirits.

A critical lets the character know the spirit's type without making another roll. A fumble means that the character thinks that no spirit is there.

In spirit combat, a creature can use Spirit Sense at 1/2 skill without using an action. It can use it at full skill if the creature uses a Miscellaneous Action.

A character can try to avoid being Sensed in several ways. Running away is helpful. If the character can get out of the spirit's Sense range, he or she is safe unless the spirit blunders upon the character again. Subtract a running character's movement rate in meters from the spirit's Sense skill. (Treat the skill as 100%, or the actual skill if higher, if the character runs away from a Visible spirit that began the melee round less than its POW in meters from the creature.) Spirits have a hard time sensing the mundane plane. Moving confuses them. Some things drive spirits away: see below under Spirit Lore.

SPIRIT SCOUTS

A Visible intelligent spirit can navigate on the mundane plane with successful use of Spirit Travel. Roll for every five minutes of travel. If the spirit is unfamiliar with the area, there is a 25 percentile penalty. If there are no landmarks to follow, as in the desert, there is a 25 percentile penalty. Either or both penalties can apply, and the GM may assign other bonuses or penalties. If the spirit misses a roll, it goes off course. It can recognize this on an INT x 5 roll. If it does see that it is off course, it can right itself with a successful Spirit Travel roll, modified as above. It loses 1D6 times 5 minutes in doing so. If it misses either roll, it is lost and never reaches its goal.

A spirit scout can try to avoid a guardian spirit that it Senses. However, if it crosses a magical barrier, it will alert someone. Common magical barriers are the glow line, the border of the Mad Sultanate, city walls, and Warding/Market boundaries.



SPIRIT LORE

Spirit Lore collects all kinds of knowledge about spirits. Its major uses are identifying spirits and knowing how to avoid or drive away spirits. Shamans can use it to remember what will Appease or Banish a kind of spirit. "Kind of spirit" means not only the Creatures Book label, but also the spirit's kindred, runes, and background. There are ghosts of trolls and plant rune healing spirits. Nymphs are linked not only to elements, but also to geography and history. Spirit Lore is a Medium difficulty Knowledge skill with a base of 5%, and cannot go up by experience.

Identifying Spirits

Characters are not born knowing the contents of the Creatures Book. Before describing a spirit to experienced players, the GM should require a Spirit Lore roll. The GM should only let those who succeeded know what the spirit looks like. There are bonuses for well-known spirits: Ghost +25, Pain Spirit +10, Madness Spirit +5, Fear Spirit +10, Wraith +10.

Characters can also identify things like chonchons, elementals, and nymphs with a successful roll. Bonuses for those things are +25 or higher.

A critical roll gives the character more information. If the character has a magical perception spell, he or she learns the size of an important statistic of the spirit. Examples include SIZ (in cubic meters, accurately) for elementals, CON (within a 5 point range) for wraiths, and INT (within a 5 point range) for hellions or chonchons. If the person lacks a magical perception spell, then he or she learns the MP of the spirit within the ranges normally provided by Second Sight.

A fumbled roll gives the person wrong information. The GM gives the player credible but wrong information. Examples include mistaking a wraith for a ghost, or a spirit as some other type of spirit.

Some spirits are almost unmistakable, such as manifested elementals. A sylph could be mistaken for a whirlvish, or vice versa, or a viewer might not know the tell-tale appearance of a chonchon. However, once a person sees these types of being a few times, he or she will always recognize them. Also, if a character knows what a gnome looks like, he or she can tell whether a gap opening in the earth is or is not a gnome.

Driving Away Spirits

Some spirits hate noise and strong smells. Light or fire tend to drive spirits of darkness away, etc.... Many people carry charms to ward off spirits, or do other magical acts to avoid them. A hunter, alone in the woods, knows how to avoid offending common spirits. Many of these things are of doubtful power.Some might have a limited effectiveness, perhaps adding +1% to +5% to the possessor's Spirit Combat skill, though oddly enough not all of these detect as magical.

Nevertheless, the God Learners proved that some things do drive away spirits or make them less likely to attack a person. A Lightwall (or sunlight) can drive away a spirit of darkness. Truestone can drive away a spirit of chaos. The death rune can drive off ghoul spirits, wraiths, and healing spirits. Many of these things will not be available to the adventurer.

There are two ways to run Spirit Lore for this purpose. If the player has no ideas, the GM can allow a roll at a proper penalty to see if the character thinks of anything. If the player does have an idea (and the materials it requires), the GM can allow a roll, perhaps with a bonus for cleverness. Planning ahead deserves a bonus of +5 to +50. The GM may let the characters ask for advice from a Spirit Lore master.

Sometimes, even the cleverest ideas fail. An idea for driving off an attacking spirit has a chance of success in the 20 to 80% range. An idea for keeping a spirit away has a chance of success in the 40 to 110% range. Subtract the MP of the spirit from the chances of success. The adjusted chance of success is never more than three times the character's Spirit Lore skill, even for the best ideas. One must understand what one is doing.



Page 8:

SPIRIT COMBAT, replace most of procedures with:



Spirit combat is the struggling of two (or more) wills. Each seeks to force its will on the other. Each tries to grind the other down to the point where it can no longer resist. Individuals in spirit combat lose MP, sometimes at a frightful rate. A losing party may try to escape, or to frighten the attacking spirit in some way. More than one spirit can attack a person, but only one person can fight a spirit.

In spirit combat, each option takes one combat action. Spirit combat attacks take place at the combatant's DEX strike rank. Spirits without DEX attack in SR 1, before all other attacks but after movement. Spirit combat defense takes 1 SR just as parry or dodge does.

If more than one attack occurs on the same DEX SR, resolve them in order from the highest Spirit Combat skill to the lowest. If this does not resolve the tie, resolve the options at the same time.

Spirit Combat is a Hard Magic skill, with a base of 25%, and can increase through experience. Where POW and Magic Points represent a character's life force and raw spiritual strength, skill in spirit combat represents a character's ability to focus their will and strength as they struggle againt a spirit. Training in Spirit Combat is normally only available to Assistant Shamans, Shamans or members of certain cults, and consists of meditative and focusing excercises, as well as exposure to spirits.

This is a well put skill in a well written section.

The common combat options in spirit combat are: Attack, Defend, All-out Attack, and All-out Defense. Under some circumstances, using Spirit Sense may take an action. See Spirit Sense, below.

There are uncommon combat options as well, known only to some shamans and assistant shamans. The common uncommon options are Appease, Banish, and Intercept. Nearly all fetches learn Intercept. Appease is fairly common, and Banish less so. There are deeper and more terrible secrets, but it is forbidden to write of them. but they are limited to extremely obscure or limited cults and are outside of the scope of normal play.

Ok, who forbade you to write about the deeper and more terrible secrets? Seriously, while that is a nice throwaway line, it is a tone shift for the rules.

ATTACK

The character makes a Spirit Combat roll. An Attack affects one target only, and takes a single melee action to perform.

Critical: Maximum damage plus rolled damage.

Special: The attack automatically does maximum damage.

Success: Roll damage normally.

Failure: No effect.

Fumble: One opponent's attempt to Appease, Banish, or use

Spirit Sense succeeds without a roll. The opponent

should roll anyway, if he or she has not already done

so. However, treat a failure or fumble as a success.

If there is more than one opponent, pick the one that

has the highest MP.

ALL-OUT ATTACK

An all-out attack requires the use of two combat actions (normally all that a character gets). The character makes a Spirit Combat roll. An All-out Attack affects one target only.

Critical: Damage is two times the maximum for the

character's MP. On a successful MP vs. MP roll, the

character may bind or possess (or do whatever it does

to defenseless targets) the target.

Special: Roll damage and add it to the maximum damage for

the character's MP.

Success: Damage is automatically the maximum for the

character's MP.

Failure: Roll again: on any successful roll, does normal

damage. There is no extra effect for a critical,

special, or fumble on the second roll.

Fumble: All opponents' attempts to Appease, Banish, or use

Spirit Sense succeed without a roll. The opponent

should roll anyway, if he or she has not already done

so. However, treat a failure or fumble as a success.

In addition, any opponent who made a normal success can

try to bind or possess the fumbler.

DEFEND

The character makes a Spirit Combat roll. A Defend works against all Attacks and attempts to Banish in one round, and takes a single melee action to perform.

Critical: No Attack or Banishment succeeds.

Special: Attack or Banishment is one level of success lower.

Success: Attack does one-half the normal damage (roll and

divide, round up). Double the defending spirit's MP for

purposes of Banishment.

Failure: No effect.

Fumble: All opponents' attempts to Appease, Attack, Banish,

or use Spirit Sense succeed without a roll. The

opponent should roll anyway, if he or she has not

already done so. However, treat a failure or fumble as

a success.



ALL-OUT DEFENSE

An all-out defense requires the use of two combat actions (normally all that a character gets). The character makes a Spirit Combat roll. An All-out Defense works against all Attacks and attempts to Banish in one round.

Critical: No Attack or Banishment succeeds, and the Defender

does normal damage to all Attackers. (This damage can

be affected by a Defend option.)

Special: No Attack or Banishment succeeds.

Success: Attack or Banishment is one level of success lower

than normal.

Failure: Attack does one-half the normal damage (roll and

divide, round up). Double the defending spirit's MP for

purposes of Banishment.

Fumble: No effect.

Damage

The damage done with a successful attack depends on the being's MP at the time of the attack.

Current MP Damage Done

01-10 1d3

11-20 1d4

21-30 1d6

31-40 1d8

41-50 1d10

51-60 2d6

61-70 2d6+2

71-80 3d6

81-90 3d6+2

91-100 4d6

etc. etc.





Page 10:

SPELL EFFECTS, add:

VISIBLE EFFECTS OF MAGIC

At the moment a spell is successfully cast, a visible disturbance occurs. The exact nature of the disturbance varies depending on the source and strength of the spell. Typically a stirring in the air around the point the spell took effect occurs, and often a flash or sheen of a certain color is seen. The exact color varies depending on the source of the spell.

Once the spell is cast, the fact that a spell is active is evident only when the spell takes effect. A spell such as Light or Fireblade will always have visible effects beyond that of the initial casting - a light or flame of a certain color. However, most spells do not have visible effects beyond that initial casting that are always obvious.

Instant, Detect and characteristic enhancing spells have a visible effect only when first cast. Most other temporal spells will have a visible effect when first cast and every time their magic comes into play. Every time a sword with a Bladesharp or Truesword spell on it hits a target, a visible discharge would occur (generally a flash of colored light, or a spark, or something of the sort). Likewise, a protective spell such as Protection, Countermagic or Shield will cause a visible discharge every time the spell's user was hit with a weapon (Protection or Shield) or spell (Countermagic or Shield).

Temporal attack spells, such as Demoralize or Befuddle, have a visible effect when first cast and when they first hit their target, but not afterwards.

Querry, based on discussions with Phil Davis about my Matrix Magix system for Mistworld. Do you want to allow spells to have sounds, smells, sights and textures, or to make such things options? Are the disturbances caused by magic actual light or are they reality ripples that are perceived most often as light?

This is an excellent area to make a mechanic modular so that it can be used if wanted or ignored as desired.

As a rule, smaller, less powerful spells have less obvious effects than larger ones. Although the physical actions and consequences of casting a spell are fairly obvious (speaking and gesturing with one hand), and will almost always be obvious outside or inside of combat, the exact visible effects (specifics of the discharge such as its color or the target it struck if a ranged attack spell) are less obvious. A successful Sleight skill roll will make the action of casting a spell less obvious, but can do little to conceal the visible effects of a spell.

The exact visible effects of casting or subsequent effects of spirit magic and sorcery spells of up to 4 points and divine spells of up to 2 points require a Scan roll to be noticed outside of combat or a Scan/2 roll to be noticed in combat. The exact visible effects of spirit magic and sorcery spells of up to 8 points and divine spells of up to 4 points are noticed outside of combat 95% of the time or in combat with a Scan roll.

The exact visible effects of spirit magic and sorcery spells of over 8 points and divine spells of over 4 points are always noticed outside of combat and noticed in combat 95% of the time. The full number of magic points used to back spirit magic or sorcery spells count towards the above amounts, as do half the magic points used to back divine spells.

Visible effects of cult spirit magic or divine magic:

Air deities - White or blue colors, electrical sparks, turbulence, wind,

haze, mist, a disturbance in the air.

Chaos deities - Black or red colors, darkness, glows, corruption, slime,

a disturbance.

Darkness deities - Black colors, shadows, darkness, cold, a disturbance

in the air, subsonics.

Earth deities - Earth, stone, mineral or green colors, gleams and glints,

a disturbance in the ground.

Fire deities - Yellow, orange or red colors, flames, heat.

Light/Sky deities - Yellow or white colors, light, flashes, gleams.

Lunar deities - Red colors, glows, sparkles (some will also share

the special effects of a related cult, such as Yanafal

Tarnils and Humakt, Etyries and Issaries, etc.)

Plant deities - Green and brown colors.

Vormain deities - As per the color of the deity's magic.

Water deities - Blue or blue green colors, moisture, fog, a disturbance

in the water.

Annilla - Blue colors or a disturbance in the air.

Donandar - Multiple colors, often pastels, shimmering.

Chalana Arroy, Issaries - White colors, light.

Gor sisters - Blood red, earth, stone and mineral colors, gleams and glints,

fissures, cracks, or other disturbances in the ground.

Humakt - Gray and dark colors.

Hunter - A disturbance in the air.

Lhankhor Mhy - White and gray colors, gleams.

Thief gods - Dark colors, shadow, a disturbance in the air.

Trickster - Varies wildly from spell to spell.

Uleria - Red and white colors.

?Pink colors?

Waha - Earth colors, a disturbance in the air.

Visible effects of shamanistic spirit magic:

Spells learned from a shaman tend to vary widely in their special effects, as some of the spell effects may actually resemble those of a divine cult, others unique. Shamans are the junk collectors of the spirit world, and almost any combination of special effects could conceivably end up in their hands.

The GM should make up an appropriate color or effect for any spirit magic spell learned by or from a shaman, or can use the following table:

01-15 Black

16-30 Blue

31-33 Blue-Green

34-43 Brown

44-50 Green

51-56 Gray

57-58 Indigo

59-65 Red

66-70 Orange

71-80 White

81-88 Yellow

89-90 Violet

91-95 A disturbance in the air

96-00 Other (or roll again)



Visible effects of sorcery:

The visible effects of sorcery spells vary greatly, but often share a certain consistency from Henotheist school to Henotheist school.

[This section will be expanded to include more detail.]





Page 11:

SPELL EFFECTS, addition:

PROTECTIVE SPELLS

Spells that provide physical protection, such as Protection or Shield, will be ignored by a critical hit that ignores armor. These spells attempt to ward damage, but are not always successful, therefore they can be penetrated by more damage then they can handle or by a strike that bypasses them (a critical hit).

Page 12:

SPIRIT MAGIC, add:

Spell Spirits

Shamans call spell spirits the source of spirit magic, the most common form of magic on Glorantha. They are native creatures of the spirit world, part of the natural flora and fauna of the spirit world, and are the natural prey and resources of many of the spirit world's other inhabitants. The exact origins of spell spirits are not known, but it is thought that they are the byproduct of the expenditures of great power. Each spell spirit is a vessel for a particular spirit magic spell. The size of the spirit tends to correspond to the power of the spell. The appearance of spell spirits varies according to the spell and the source of the power that created it.



You hit a good point. Spell spirits have always struck me as a little strange. I'm glad you don't have a glib retort here. Personally, I would think they were remnants of the gods' age and the various unions of the gods and runes, reduced to smaller size.

Page 15:

BENEFITS OF BECOMING A SHAMAN, add:



Shamans may learn one or more of the following special abilities. (listed below) Only fetches learn Intercept. Many shamans only have that one ability throughout their careers. Others find spirits or shamans who can teach them another one. Learning one of these abilities takes a week's time for both teacher and student. Intercept and Appease are commonly available, and take a week (50 hours) to learn. The others are rarer, and take a month (200 hours) to learn.



APPEASE

A shaman can only appease a disembodied spirit. (A discorporate shaman is not a disembodied spirit under this rule, but the spirit of a dead shaman is.) Some spirits will not accept appeasement. A hostile spirit needs a large sacrifice to be appeased. A shaman can make a neutral spirit friendly by a successful appeasement. A shaman can try to Appease spirits when he or she is discorporate.

The shaman sacrifices some MP or releases a bound spirit, and makes a Spirit Combat roll. The shaman loses the bound spirit or MP. He or she can use personal MP, the fetch's MP, or a POW spirit's MP. A typical appeasement would be 20 MP or a useful spirit.

On a simple Spirit Combat success, the shaman has a chance to succeed. If the spirit to be Appeased makes a successful Spirit Combat roll, it gains the MP or can bind or Control the released spirit. Both the shaman and the spirit must succeed if there is to be any chance the spirit will be Appeased. The spirit needs the right Control spell if that is the option it picks.

The chance of actual Appeasement depends on many factors: the size of the sacrifice (+), the strength of the shaman and his or her fetch (+), the strength of the spirit (-), and the depth of hatred or dislike (-). As a rule of thumb, match the shaman's magic points against those of the spirit in a resistance roll, and add 1% to the chance of success for every magic point successfully fed to the spirit.

If a shaman criticals the Spirit Combat roll, the spirit will automatically gain one-fifth the MP or bind or Control the released spirit, if it tries. If the shaman fails the roll, the spirit cannot gain the MP or bind or Control the released spirit. If the shaman fumbles, he or she angers the spirit instead of Appeasing it.

If the shaman and spirit both succeed, the spirit gets one-fifth of the MP sacrificed to it. If the shaman sacrifices a point of POW at the same time, however, the spirit gets all the MP sacrificed to it. The point of POW sets up a link with the spirit, and any donation of MP will succeed without a roll. The spirit will always get all of the MP sacrificed to it by a shaman with a link.



BANISH



An attempt to Banish takes both of a shaman's combat actions in a round. The shaman must sense the spirit before he or she can Banish it. The spirit must be within his or her POW in meters. The shaman needs to make a Spirit Combat roll. On a success, he or she can Banish the spirit on a successful MP v. MP roll. Use only the shaman's personal MP, not the fetch's. A Banished spirit must leave the area and not return. If it was Visible, it becomes non-visible for that time.

On a special, the spirit flees through the Frontier Region of the spirit plane into the Outer Region. On a critical, it cannot return to the Frontier Region or the mundane plane on its own.

The spirit will be the shaman's enemy, even if the Banishment fails. If it does fail, the spirit will usually Attack.

A spirit can Defend against a Banishment.

Some things will help or hurt a Banishment. If the spirit is in its native medium (plant spirit in forest, darkness spirit in darkness), add 5 to its MP for purposes of resisting Banishment. If the shaman is in a place of strength (tribal holy place, axis mundi), add 5 to his MP for purposes of Banishing. Commotion bothers spirits using Visibility or Second Sight, adding 5 to the shaman's MP.



INTERCEPT



A fetch is part of the shaman, but gets its own actions in melee. Its Spirit Combat, Spirit Sense, and Spirit Lore skills are the same as the shaman's. A fetch cannot Appease or Banish.

A fetch can intercept an attacking spirit. This does not use one of the fetch's actions unless the spirit has already attacked the shaman in a previous round.

If the fetch intercepts the attacking spirit, it enters spirit combat with it. This prevents the spirit from reaching the shaman. A fetch can intercept any number of spirits in one round. It can even intercept if it is already in spirit combat. Intercepted spirits cannot attack the shaman until the fetch's MP fall to zero.

A fetch cannot intercept spirits that attack the shaman when he or she is discorporate. However, it can and does intercept spirits that try to possess the shaman's body while the shaman's spirit is out of it.



SHAMANIC MAGIC



Shamans have access to many rare and unusual forms of spirit magic. This is one of the distinguishing features of shaman, as an experienced shaman is very likely to know at least one rare or unique spirit magic spell that players may not have previously encountered, or even heard of, and is one of the reasons shamans are often figures of mystery. These rare and unusual spells can range from spells that are useless; to spells that resemble the special spirit magic spells of a specific cult, such as Jump or River Eyes; to spells that are variations of more common spirit magic spells, such as a Frostblade or Detect Life spell; to unique spells that do not correspond to any known spirit magic spells.

As a rule of thumb, a typical tribal shaman will come across one such useful rare or unique spell every 10 years. As a result, they will almost never part with such spells.

An example of one of the unique rare spells known to shamans is called Spirit Sword. The spell spirits that know it are rare, so shamans almost never let their followers learn it. The most likely way a non-shaman would have it is in a spell spirit binding matrix (with a user restriction, of course).

Spirit Sword

Variable

Touch, Temporal, Passive

Common names: Spirit Sword, Spirit Mace, Spirit Spear,

This spell enhances one's ability to defeat spirits one is fighting. Each point of the spell adds 5 percentiles to the target's Spirit Combat skill with an Attack or All-out Attack option. Every four points also adds 1 to the damage the target does with a successful Attack. (That is, 1 to 3 points add none, 4 to 7 points add one, etc.) The damage bonus for Spirit Sword is not doubled on a special or critical success in spirit combat.



SHAMANS ON THE SPIRIT PLANE



Spirit Travel is the skill of navigating the spirit plane. A discorporate spirit can use it to travel the mundane plane. It is a Hard magic skill with a base of 10, and can go up by experience. To be trained, the student must be disembodied or be able to discorporate. Normally, only a shaman, or certain spirits, can teach it, and only to a spirit or another shaman.

On a successful Spirit Travel roll, the shaman moves to the region he or she wants to reach. A failure leaves the shaman in the previous region and subjects him or her to another encounter there. A critical takes the shaman to the spirit or place where he or she wanted to go. A fumble gets the shaman lost. A lost shaman needs to make another roll to return to his or her body and start over.

To find the right kind of spirit, the shaman makes a roll with a modifier for the spirit's rarity. Use as a guide for the modifier the number of percentiles devoted to that spirit on the encounter tables in the Gamemaster Book. A spirit with 10 or more percentiles is common on that plane, and there is no modifier. If the spirit gets less than 10 percentiles, subtract 5 from the shaman's Spirit Travel skill for every percentile less than 10.

If the shaman wants a specific kind of spirit, such as a specific spell spirit, there is a further modifier. For a common type (common spell spirit, common nymph, common disease spirit, etc.) subtract 25 from the shaman's Spirit Travel skill. A shaman must go to the Outer or Inner Region to find an uncommon type (berserker passion spirit, uncommon spell spirit, magic spirit with a specific spell, etc.). Subtract 50 from the shaman's Spirit Travel skill for an uncommon type. For a rare type (cult spirit, rare spell spirits, one of the demons mentioned in the Creatures Book, etc.) subtract 75 in the Inner Region and 100 in the Outer.

There is almost no chance of finding a rare or exotic type in the Frontier Region. For exotic and unique spirits subtract 100. These only exist in the Inner Region. If the shaman knows the spirit's true name, add 50 to his skill.

A shaman can also sense and avoid large spirits on the spirit plane at the limits of spirit perception. This is a use of the Spirit Sense skill.



Page 16:

LEARNING AND USING SPELLS, replace most of with:

Both shamans and priests may teach spirit magic. However, priests that are not shamans have access to only cult spell spirits.

Priests generally explain that their Spellteaching rituals summon a cult spirit from which knowledge of the spell is gained. Depending on the cult, the ceremony to obtain the use of the cult spell spirits magic will vary, as will what occurs when the cultist attempts to learn the spell. With the divine magic Spellteaching ritual, the cultist normally engages the cult spirit in spirit combat, which is typically Commanded not to resist.

Once the spirit is reduced to 0 magic points, the spirit appears to be absorbed by the cultist, and he or she gains the use of the desired spirit magic spell. The exact means by which the cult spirit is absorbed vary from cult to cult. Darkness cultists consume the spirit, Air cultists inhale the spirit, Fire/Sky cultists absorb heat, fire or light, Water cultists drink or breathe the sprit in, Moon cultists have a glow seep into them, Humakti feel the spirit cut its way into them, Harmony or Fertility cultists feel the spirit flow into them, Earth cultists absorb it, etc. Typically a limited number of cult spirit magic spells are available to a given temple (see Temple Sizes).

To obtain the use of the spirit magic spell from a shaman, one must defeat a spell spirit that the shaman has summoned or brought over from the spirit world in spirit combat. The spirit will resist, though the shaman may be willing to cast spells that will aid the spell seeker, generally at an additional cost. If the spell spirit is defeated, by reducing it to 0 magic points, the spirit vanishes, and the victor gains the use of the spell. Shamans claim that the spell spirit becomes part of the victor, although no obvious signs of the spirit can be detected. If the spell spirit wins, the seeker is possessed by it, and as it is incapable of operating a body, the possessed individual effectively becomes comatose until the spirit is exorcised. The shaman will generally exorcise the spirit, but again, at an additional cost.



Page 16:

LIMITS TO SPELLS MEMORIZATION, add:

Note that although the player will know exactly how many points a spirit magic spell is, characters will actually not know exactly how many points a spell is, although they will have a rough idea (1-2 points small, 3-4 points medium, 5-6 points large, 7 or more points very large) of the power of the size and power of the spell.

Page 17:

SPIRIT MAGIC, replace most of with:

To use spirit magic, one calls upon the power of the spell. In a melee situation, this requires spending DEX SR + magic points in spell in SR. For the spell to be successfully cast requires a roll equal to or less than POWx5. If the roll succeeds, the spell is cast successfully and the caster loses the magic points spent to cast the spell. A failed roll results in the spell not being cast and the caster expending 1 magic point. A fumbled roll results in the spell not being cast and the caster losing all the magic points that would normally have been spent to cast the spell.

Range of Spirit Magic

The range of a Ranged spirit magic spell is POWx5 in meters.



Page 18:

SPIRIT MAGIC SPELLS, add:

Variety of Spirit Magic Spells

A great variety of spirit magic spells exist. The most common spirit magic spells have hundreds of subtle variations, primarily in how they appear when cast, but also in how they are learned and what they are used for. The God Learners cataloged over 100 different versions of the basic Disruption spell, for example.

Under the description of each of the most common spirit magic spells is a list of the most common names the spell goes by. Although the spell should be listed by the primary name on a character's sheet, the character may well refer to the spell by another common name. Characters will generally think of two distinct versions of a spell with different names and visible effects as two different spells, even though they have identical game effects.

A farmer that learned Slay Pest from a local shaman and later became a Humakti mercenary might well consider learning the Humakt cult spirit magic spell Disruption as well.



Page 18:

SPIRIT MAGIC SPELLS, various additions and corrections:

Armoring Enchantment

Common names: Armoring Enchantment, Enchant Armor

Befuddle

Common names: Befuddle, Bemuse, Confuse, Stun.

Replace spell description with:

This spell confuses an opponent that succumbs to it. It will cause him or her to wonder such things as: Why am I here? Is that a friend? What is happening? Who are they? Which ones are my enemies? Why is everybody fighting? When this spell successfully overcomes the power of its victim, make an INT roll for the victim. If the roll is above INTx5, the target of the spell will stand still for the duration of the spell, trying to figure out what is happening.

If attacked, they can abort to a dodge or parry (at -20%), and beginning next round will no longer act as confused (the guy that attacked me is my enemy, and once he is dead his obvious allies are my enemies). Thus, with some clever management, a Befuddled opponent might actually end up attacking his own party for as long as the spell remains in effect.

If the INT roll is equal to or below INTx5, the target realizes that he or she cannot fully comprehend the situation, but will react defensively if the situation in any away appears dangerous, taking any appropriate defensive action (they can dodge, parry, flee, put their back to a wall, cast defensive spells or heal themselves, etc.). If attacked their confusion will be resolved as above, and they will attack and defend normally in the next melee round.

If the INT roll is equal to or below INTx1, in addition to reacting to a dangerous situation, the target realized they have been Befuddled, and can attempt to dispel the Befuddle should they know an appropriate spell. If attacked, they can choose to attack back, should they think this is truly a foe, but since they realize that they are Befuddled, it is more difficult to trick them into attacking their friends or allies (they can choose to remain entirely on the defensive, or should they attack will often be more careful not to kill opponents in case they made the wrong decision).

Binding Enchantment

Common names: Binding Enchantment, Spirit Trapping Enchantment, Spirit Trap

Bladesharp

Common names: Bladesharp, Keenedge, Plowsharp, Sharpen, Swordsharp

Bludgeon

Common names: Bludgeon, Hammeright, Pound, Smite

Control (Species)

Common names: Control, Bind Spirit, Command, Spirit Binding

Coordination

Common names: Coordination, Dexterity, Nimblefinger

Correction: Each point of Coordination increases the target's DEX by 2.

Countermagic

Common names: Countermagic, Spellward, Spell Shield

Darkwall

Common names: Darkwall, Darkness, Shade, Shadow

Demoralize

Common names: Demoralize, Fear, Panic, Rout

Detect

Common names: Detect, Find, Sense

Dispel Magic

Common names: Dispel Magic, Dispel, Lower Magic

Dullblade

Common names: Dullblade, Padding

Disruption

Common names: Disruption, Eurmal's Kiss, Harm, Kill Rats, Shatter, Slay Pest,

Wound

Endurance

Common names: Endurance, Restore Wind, Second Wind, Stamina

Replace spell description with:

Every point of this spell counts as a single rest action for the purposes of restoring short term fatigue losses. Effectively, every two points of the spell immediately restores a single lost level of short term fatigue. A Weary character that has is hit by an Endurance 4 spell will be restored to Normal fatigue levels.

Extinguish

Common names: Extinguish, Douse, Smother

Fanaticism

Common names: Fanaticism, Enrage

Farsee

Common names: Farsee, Eagle's Eye, Hawkeye, Farview, Longsee, Longview

Firearrow

Common names: Firearrow, Flamearrow

Fireblade

Common names: Fireblade, Flameblade, Firesword, Weapon of Flame

Glamour

Common names: Glamour, Bedazzle, Charm, Uleria's Blessing

Glue

Common names: Glue, Fasten, Hold

Heal

Common names: Heal, Cure Wounds, Healing, Treat Wounds

Ignite

Common names: Ignite, Firestarter, Spark

Ironhand

Common names: Ironhand, Ironfist, Toothsharp, Godsday Punch

Light

Common names: Light, Glow

Lightwall

Common names: Lightwall, Dazzle, Wall of Light

Magic Point Matrix Enchantment

Common names: Power Storage Enchantment, Storing Enchantment

Mindspeech

Common names: Mindspeech, Mindwords, Telepathy, Whisper

Mobility

Common names: Mobility, Fleetfoot, Speed

Replace spell description with:

Each point of the spell adds 1 meter to the target's maximum movement in both the Move Phase and the Post Melee Move phase. A character with a base move of 3 m and a Mobility 5 spell taking a single action and double move will move at (3 x 2) +5 or 11 meters in the Move and Post Melee Move phases. If the target has used the extra movement in the last 5 melee rounds, subtract 5% per point of Mobility used from that Fatigue Roll.

Multimissile

Common names: Multimissile, Arrow Swarm, Twoshot, Threeshot, etc., Volley

Protection

Common names: Protection, Armor, Furstiff, Protect, Ward Damage

Correction: Delete the last sentence.

Repair

Common names: Repair, Fix, Restore

Addition: If a successful Craft (Item) skill roll is made when

casting Repair, the item will not show a visible scar and

will not permanently lose any hit points or armor points.

Depending on the item in question, this may take some preparation

time before the casting of the spell.

Second Sight

Common names: Second Sight, Magic Sight, Magic Vision, Sight, Spirit Eye

Shimmer

Common names: Shimmer, Blur, Cloud, Evasion

Silence

Common names: Silence, Hush, Sneak

Correction: Each point adds 15 percentiles to Sneak.

Slow

Common names: Slow, Hinder, Hobble, Immobilize

Speedart

Common names: Speedart, Arrowboost

Correction: Duration is Temporal.

Spell Matrix Enchantment

Common names: Spell Enchantment, Spell Spirit Trap Enchantment

Spirit Screen

Common names: Spirit Screen, Ghost Shield, Spirit Shield

Replace spell description with: This spell protects someone from attack by spirits. Each point of the spell adds 10 percentiles to the character's Spirit Combatskill for a Defend or an All-out Defense option. The Spirit Screen works as a separate Defense option if the character does not choose a Defend option. In that case, however, the character rolls only for the Spirit Screen. Do not add it to his or her Spirit Combat skill. A character with Spirit Screen 2 up that was not defending against an attacking spirit would have a 20% skill for a free Defense action.

Strength

Common names: Strength, Lift Cart, Swell Thews

Summon (Species)

Common names: Summon, Call, Invoke

Vigor

Common names: Vigor, Health

Visibility

Common names: Visibility, Manifest

Correction: Visibility is a Ranged spell.

Page 23:

DIVINE MAGIC, add:

Divine Magic, also commonly known as Rune Magic, is better codified and more standardized than is spirit magic, and although different names for the same spell may be used on occasion, generally any common divine spell will be recognized by its common name.

Divine magic spells are typically thought of as as 'prayers'. A character with Shield 8 would know that he has sacrificed for 8 prayers of Shield, for instance, and would know that he can use but a single prayer of Shield, or more than one at once for added protection, but would not know the exact effects of the added protection in game terms.

He or she will generally have some idea of the prayer's effect, such as that using all eight prayers of Shield at once provides at least the same physical protection as iron plate for about 15 minutes, and that two prayers of Shield used at once are probably twice as good as a single prayer of Shield, but that is generally as far as the character's understanding will go.

USES OF DIVINE MAGIC IN SOCIETY

Divine magic is considerably more powerful than spirit magic, and has a correspondingly greater effect on societies in which it is common. Fertility spells are often used to enhance the growth of crops; truth spells may be used at trials and oath swearings or to interrogate prisoners; markets, shops and important buildings are often warded; specific questions can be answered through divination; and even the dead can be brought back to life.

Although divine magic is rarely used without a good reason, when important, it can be put to use with great effect.

Page 27:

LEARNING AND USING SPELLS, various additions and changes:

A divine magic spell has a 95% chance of being successfully cast. On a roll of 96-99, the spell was not successfully invoked, and the caster can try again. On a roll of 00, the spell was miscast, and the spell was actually invoked, but did not affect its intended target.



SPELLTEACHING



The divine magic Spellteaching ritual summons a cult spirit that can impart knowledge of a cult spirit magic spell to a cultist. Typically, a limited number of cult spirit magic spells are available to a given temple.

Some guidelines:

Spellteaching rituals at a minor temple (see Temple Sizes) generally make 4 points of cult spirit magic available for every active worshipper at the temple. This (4 points) is also the largest size variable cult spirit magic spell available to the temple. It is up to the priests to distribute the spells as they will, typically to cult members they wish to reward or that can afford to pay for the privilege of learning the spells.

A typical distribution, for a minor temple, given 20% high initiates (priests, rune lords, allied spirits, cult spirits, acolytes and advanced initiates), 40% initiates and 40% lay members, would be INT points of cult spirit magic spells for high initiates, 1d3 points for initiates, and 1 point for lay members.

Major temples are generally limited to 8 points, with a typical distribution of INT points of cult spirit magic spells for high initiates, 3d3 points for initiates, and 2d3 points for lay members.

Great temples are generally limited to 10 points, with a typical distribution of INT points of cult spirit magic spells for high initiates and half the initiates, 4d3 points for other initiates, and 3d3 points for lay members.

Major cults or deities often surpass these limits, typically offering an additional point or two of a specific cult spirit magic spell to initiates and above. The Humakt cult teaches 4 additional points of Bladesharp to its initiates for free. The Chalana Arroy cult teaches 2 additional points of Heal to any interested initiates, at the normal costs. Initiates of Ernalda can purchase an additional point of Heal. Initiates of the Orlanth cult can purchase an additional point of Bladesharp and an additional point of Mobility at the normal costs. These additional points apply to the limits to variable spells as well, i.e., a Humakti minor temple would have access to Bladesharp 8.

In general, temples will not sell their cult spirit magic spells to an outsider that is not an active worshipper of the deity or an associated cult. If they do, the prices will be exorbitant.

Page 28:

SPELL LIMITS, add to first paragraph:



Initiates cannot learn spells that are one-use for priests.



Page 29:

TEMPLE SIZES, replace with:

Glorantha is a magic rich world with many actively

worshipped deities. Most sites of active worship are

sanctified, either by a Sanctify spell or by being a

holy site of that particular religion.

Site (0-50 initiates, typically 0)

A site is a simple place of worship where members of a religion

gather to worship on holy days. A site has no magical effect in

itself, a worshipper cannot learn or regain spells here, nor does

it have any defenses. Such a place will usually not support a full

time priest, nor will it detect as magical by itself.

Shrine (1-100 initiates, typically 25)

Shrines are the most common form of holy site. Every village or

clan hearth will have one or more shrines. The shrines may be

dedicated to an obscure local spirit or a great diety. The priest

of a shrine may often be indistinguishable from the rest of the locals.

At a shrine only the Divine spell of Worship Diety and a single

divine spell special to the religion are available to learn or renew.

Maintaining an active shrine typically requires the sacrifice

of 10 magic points on the holy day of the religion. If the area is

not sanctified, i.e., the site is not one particularly holy to

the religion, and no Sanctify spell has been cast, it requires

the sacrifice of five times the amount of magic points, or 50

magic points.

Minor Temple (10-400 initiates, typically 100)

A temple size commonly found in towns. There will be several

priests, perhaps not well paid, a few servants, and perhaps

an errand boy. Only the divine spells of Worship Deity,

Spellteaching, and divine magics special to the religion are

available for renewal, learning or defense. Spirit magic spells

special to the religion may be learned as well.

Maintaining an active minor temple generally requires the

sacrifice of 50 magic points on the holy day of the religion.

If the area is not sanctified, i.e., the site is not one

particularly holy to the religion, and no Sanctify spell has

been cast, it requires the sacrifice of five times the amount of

magic points, or 250 magic points.

Major Temple (100-1000 initiates, typically 400)

A temple size commonly found in cities. There will be a number

of priests, resident initiates, and a number of servants.

Here all common divine magics and divine magics special to

the religion are available for renewal, learning or defense.

Spirit magic spells special to the religion may be learned as well.

Maintaining an active major temple generally requires

the sacrifice of 250 magic points on the religion's holy day.

If the area is not sanctified, i.e., the site is not one

particularly holy to the religion, and no Sanctify spell

has been cast, it requires the sacrifice of five times

the amount of magic points, or 1,250 magic points.

Great Temple (500+ initiates, typically 1600)

A temple size commonly found in large cities. Depending on the

religion, there will be dozens to hundreds of priests in a great

temple, many initiates occupying various specialized posts, and

a dither of servants rushing in and out of the gates. Spells

available for renewal, learning or defense at a great temple

include all common divine magics, divine magics special to the

religion, spirit magic spells special to the religion, and all

spells granted by any associate cult or religion.

Maintaining an active major temple generally requires

the sacrifice of 1,250 magic points on the religion's holy day.

If the area is not sanctified, i.e., the site is not one

particularly holy to the religion, and no Sanctify spell

has been cast, it requires the sacrifice of five times

the amount of magic points, or 5,000 magic points.

Typical worshippers sacrifice a single magic point on the cult

holy day. Note that a small number of particularly devoted or

fanatical worshippers can maintain a higher level temple by

sacrificing an unusually large amount of magic points,

particularly if the area is a sanctified one.

However, this

will not allow the maintenance of a temple with less than the

minimum listed number of initiates (i.e., 1 initiate is the

minimum for an active shrine, 10 initiates for a lesser temple,

100 initiates for a major temple, and 500 initiates for a greater

temple, even with an unusually high sacrifice of magic points on

the worshipper's part).

Lay members also worship, but as they have not established the close link to the god that initiates have, the contributions of five lay members will generally do as much as the contributions of a single initiate.

Note that disembodied spirits can and do worship, thus letting some ancestor worship cults have hundreds or thousands of worshippers at what would be a shrine in the absence of these ghosts.

Big point. Explains Prax.



Page 29:

TEMPLE DEFENSES, replace second paragraph with:

As a side effect of worship, every 100 initiates worshipping at

a temple will typically provide 1 point of Power that is

allotted for the defense of the temple. This amount depends more

on the sacrifice of permanent power to the god for initiation and

divine magic than the sacrifice of magic points during worship

ceremonies.

For this reason, the amount will generally not exceed

1 point of Power for every 50 initiates, even with particularly active

and devoted worshippers or lay members. Commonly used spells are Sanctify,

Warding, Find Enemy and any attack or summoning spells common to the religion. The spells will regenerate at the rate of 1 point a day

if instant or temporal spells are triggered, or if they are

dispelled. A standard distribution is 50% to the inner sanctum,

25% to the outer sanctum or priests' quarters, and 25% to the

outer defenses.



Page 31:

SPELL DESCRIPTIONS, various additions and corrections:

Absorption, p. 31

Aldrya, Asrelia, Dendara, Kyger Litor, Gorgorma, Subere

Correction:

Delete the last sentence.

Berserk, p. 31

Babeester Gor, Gorgorma, Humakt (one use), Storm Bull,

Yanafal Tarnils (one use), Zorak Zoran

Replace fifth paragraph with:

For the duration of the spell, the Berserker will not suffer any ill effects of fatigue loss, acting as if at normal levels of fatigue, regardless of the fatigue level they were at when the spell was cast. When the spell expires or is dispelled, the Berserker will suffer all the effects of short term fatigue loss incurred during the spells duration. As a character under the influence of a Berserk spell will not pause to rest, this will typically result in the character dropping into the Exhausted or Incapacitated fatigue classes, from which he or she can recover normally.

Bless Crops, p. 32

Dendara, Ernalda, Grain Goddesses

Cloud Call, p.32

Heler, Orlanth, Valind

Add:

Cloud Call can be modified by climate (including microclimate) and season. At the gamemaster's option, 1 to 5 percentiles can be added to the effect of each point of Cloud Call for optimal climate (i.e., Wintertop, Stormwalk Mountains, Fethlon) and/or season (Storm Season, Sea Season).

Command (Species), p. 33

Various

Correction:

Command (Species) is a 1 point spell, and is capable of

affecting intelligent creatures.

Create Ghost, p. 33

Gorgorma, Humakt (one use)

Excommunication, p. 33

Add:

This can only be successfully cast on an initiate or higher level member of a cult by the priest that initiated him into the cult or a priest of the same cult with the authority to exocommunicate (the exact details of which priests have this status vary from religion to religion).

Extension, p. 34

Replace the last sentence of the first paragraph:

This spell and the Illusion spells are the only exceptions to the rule that only one Divine spell can be cast per spell action.

Fear, p. 33

Gorgorma, Magasta, Storm Bull, Wachaza, Zorak Zoran

Replace results of the Fear Spell Table with:

Critical Victim dies of fear.

Special Victim collapses for 15 minutes, and must make

a CONx5 roll or die as above.

Success Victim is Demoralized for 15 minutes, as per the spirit

magic spell.

Failure No effect on normal INT creatures, restricted INT creatures

are Demoralized for 15 minutes, as per the spirit magic spell.

Fumble Victim is unaffected.

Float, p.34

Dormal, Magasta, River Gods

Heal Body, p.34

Aldrya, Babeester Gor, Dendara, Chalana Arroy, Ernalda, Gorgorma, Pamalt,

Triolinia, Yelm, Yelmalio

Illusions, p. 34

Donandar, Trickster

Replace the last paragraph with:

Along with the spell Extension, Illusion spells are the only exceptions to the rule that only one Divine spell can be cast during a spell action.

Extension needs to note the Illusion spells as well instead of just itself.

Lightning, p. 35

Lightning Boy, Mastakos, Orlanth

Madness, p. 35

Red Goddess, Seven Mothers

Replace results of the Madness Spell Table with:

Critical Catatonia. Victim collapses for 30 minus POW days

(minimum 1 day) and loses 1d4 INT permanently.

This effect can not be dispelled.

Special Paranoia. Victim attacks nearest person as if Fanatic

(see the spirit magic spell Fanaticism) for 15 minutes.

If the first target falls, the victim moves on to the next

closet target. If no targets are left, the victim becomes

catatonic for the remainder of the spell effect, and cannot

be awakened.

Success Victim is Befuddled for 15 minutes, as per the spirit magic spell.

Failure No effect on normal INT creatures, restricted INT creatures

are confused for 15 minutes, as if failing an INT roll after

being hit by a Befuddle spell that could actually affect a

restricted INT creature.

Fumble Victim is unaffected.

Mindblast, p. 35

Red Goddess, Seven Mothers, Trickster

Reflection, p. 35

Aldrya, Etyries, Red Goddess, Seven Mothers

Regrow Limb. p.36

Aldrya, Chalana Arroy, Dendara, Ernalda, Flamal, Grain Goddess, Issaries,

Lodril, Red Goddess, Seven Mothers, Xiola Umbar

Restore Health, p.36

Chalana Arroy, Xiola Umbar, Various

Resurrect, p. 36

Ritual Spell (Cermony), Nonstackable, Reusable

Aldrya (one use), Ancestor Worship (one use), Chalana Arroy, Seven Mothers,

Xiola Umbar (one use), Yelm (one use)

Add to p. 36:

Sever Spirit

3 points

Ranged, Instant, Nonstackable, Reusable

Humakt, Yanafal Tarnils (one use), Zorak Zoran (one use). This spell cuts the bond between the body and spirit of the target. The user must make a successful MP vs. MP roll. If succesful, the target dies. If unsuccessful, the target takes 1d6 damage to his or her general hit points, with effects similar to poison damage.

Shield, p. 36

Aldrya, Babeester Gor, Gorgorma, Humakt, Lodril, Maran Gor, Orlanth,

Pole Star, Storm Bull, Wachaza, Waha, Xiola Umbar, Yanafal Tarnils, Yelm,

Yelmalio, Zorak Zoran

Correction:

Delete the first sentence of the last paragraph of the spell description.

Soul Sight, p. 36

Correction:

Soul Sight is actually a 1 point spell.

Spirit Block, p. 37

Replace spell description with:

Each point adds 50 percentiles to the character's Spirit Combat skill for a Defend or an All-out Defense option. The Spirit Block works as a separate Defense option if the character does not choose a Defend option. In that case, however, the character rolls only for the Spirit Block. Do not add it to his or her Spirit Combat skill.

In addition, each point of Spirit Block acts as one point of 'spiritual armor', which absorb one point of magic point drain from spirit combat, just as physical armor absorbs damage. Critical spirit attack successes ignore this armor. A character with Spirit Block 2 up that was not defending against an attacking spirit would have a 100% skill for a free Defense action, and would subtract 2 magic points of damage from any non-critical spirit combat attacks.

Interesting change.

Sunspear, p.37

Yelm, Yelmalio

Thunderbolt, p. 37

Lightning Boy, Orlanth

True (Weapon) p. 37:

Humakt, Seven Mothers, Yanafal Tarnils

Addition: The spell is compatible with Bladesharp or Bludgeon, as appropriate for the weapon, but if a Fireblade is cast on it, it will do the Fireblade damage or the Truesword damage, whichever is greater.

Page 38:

SORCERY, various changes in mechanics:

[This section is not yet complete, but we thought we'd include it

to get people's comments on the proposed changes in basic mechanics.

This system abolishes Free INT, and using a system that is entirely

skill based instead, with no limits to the number of spells or

sorcery skills a sorcerer can learn other than time.]



Querry. Why abolish Free INT? That concept made familiars extremely important and made all sorts of interesting changes in character actions. The reason for the change ought to be discussed.

SORCERY MECHANICS

Preparing to cast a Low Magic spell requires 3 SR.

Preparing to cast a High Magic spell requires 6 SR.

Casting time is normally preparation SR + DEX SR + total magic points

used in SR.

A sorcery spell can be readied, then held ready to cast as long as the caster moves no faster than his or her basic movement rate per melee round and his or her concentration is not broken. A ready spell is cast at DEX SR + total magic points used in SR (in other words, preparation SR are ignored).

The effects of sorcery spells are not additive. If two similar spells are cast on the same target, only the higher powered spell will have an effect.

So, no multispell? Not. Must mean that if two spell casters attack a monster, only the more powerful spell hits? ??

SPELL MANIPULATION

The sorcery skills of Intensity, Range, Duration and Multispell allow a sorcerer to manipulate a sorcery spell, adding additional power, duration or range to the spell, or casting multiple spells at a reduced cost.

LIMITS TO SPELL MANIPULATION

The maximum level of manipulation (Intensity, Duration, etc.) that can be added to a spell is the manipulation skill%/10, or the spell skill%/10, whichever is lower. Round up in all cases.

For example, a sorceror that knows Intensity 55%, Range 94% and the Neutralize Magic spell at 74% may add at most 6 levels of Intensity and 7 levels of Range to the Neutralize Magic spell.

Ok, this is a sensible change that I've thought was a long time coming and needed as well.

MAXIMUM SPELL MANIPULATION

The maximum total manipulation that can be used on any given spell is equal to the character's INT. An INT 13 character could use at most 13 levels of a single manipulation, assuming he or she had the skill at 125% or higher, or two or more manipulations totalling 13 points, such as 6 levels of Intensity and 7 levels of Range.

Will Familiars change this number. E.g. Sorceror with INT 16 and familiar with INT 4. Can the character manipulate 20 or just 16?

SPELL COST

A spell typically costs 1 Magic Point plus 1 Magic Point for every level of manipulation applied to it.

For example, if the sorceror above casts a Neutralize Magic spell with 6 extra levels of Intensity and 7 extra levels of Range, the total Magic Points spent would be: 1 (base cost) + 7 (for 7 range levels) + 6 (for 6 levels of extra Intensity) = 14 Magic Points.

The Multispell manipulation can reduce this cost in certain cases.

BASIC SORCERY SKILLS

The following sorcery skills are traditionally tought to most peasants, commoners and townsmen. They are also taught to acothylists and apprentices.

Intensity

As per RQIII, except that:

A missed Intensity roll costs 1 magic point and fails to add any intensity to the spell. A fumbled Intensity roll fails to add intensity to the spell and costs the full number of magic points that would normally have been expended on the additional intensity. Intensity is a Medium difficulty Magic skill.

Ceremony

As per RQIII, except that:

Ceremony bonuses have no effect on the maximum level of any manipulation,

they simply increase the chance of a successful cast. Ceremony is a Medium

difficulty Magic skill.

Do they cost Magic Points?

Are you going to have a simplified Sorcery System for GMs who find this all too complicated [just as the combat system needs a modular simplification -- and has one readily implied by RQI].



LOW MAGIC

Low Magic is the simplest form of sorcery to learn. These spells are studied by peasants, commoners, townsmen, acothylists and apprentices alike. They are also the safest sorcery spells that can be cast. If one misses a casting roll with a Low Magic spell, the spell is not cast. If the roll is fumbled, one magic point is lost, with no other ill effects. A critical success costs no magic points

TIME TO LEARN LOW MAGIC

After 25 hours of study, a skill level equal to the students

INTx3 is acquired. Further study is as per an Easy Magic skill.

LOW MAGIC SPELLS

(This section will consist of list of commonly available low magic, which

will include spells such as Enhance <Statistic>, healing spells,

Bless <Tool> spells, detection spells, repair spells, light, ignite,

and extinguish spells.

ADVANCED SORCERY SKILLS

These skills are generally only taught to sorcerers of the apprentice rank or higher. Enchant and Summon are on occasion taught to acothylists.

Sorcery Lore

The basic knowledge skill of sorcery. Sorcery Lore allows a sorcerer to understand and identify sorcerous spells and enchantments. If the sorceror is unfamiliar with the spell or enchantment in question, he or she can only identify the basic properties of the spell or enchantment.

Identifying spells or enchantments generally requires Mystic Vision or some other means of seeing magic to be useful, although if trying to recognize a spell being cast, rolling under half thesorcerer's Sorcery Lore allows the sorceror to recognize the spell being cast by seeing and hearing the caster's gestures and intonations alone.

ADVANCED MANIPULATIONS

Duration

As per RQIII, except that:

A missed Duration roll costs one magic point and fails to

add any duration to the spell. A fumbled Duration roll fails to add

duration to the spell and costs the full number of magic points that

would normally have been expended on the additional duration.

Duration is a Hard Magic skill.

Range

As per RQIII, except that:

The caster must have direct line of sight to affect

a target, and spells with Touch range cannot be extended. A missed

Range roll costs 1 magic point and fails to add any range to the spell.

A fumbled Range roll fails to add range to the spell and costs the full

number of magic points that would normally have been expended

on the additional range. Range is a Hard Magic skill.

Multispell

This manipulation allows for casting multiple spells at a reduced cost

in magic points. Each spell may be directed at a different target

provided that all targets are within range and sight of the caster.

It can also be used to cast spells on each other, i.e., casting

Resist Magic on a spell to make it difficult to detect with Detect

Magic or Mystic Vision. Ritual magic cannot be Multispelled.

Each level of Multispell permits one additional spell to be cast.

First the sorcerer determines the amount of Intensity, Range, and

Duration he will use, within his normal limits, and all spells are

affected identically. However, Touch spells gain no range this way,

and Instant spells gain no duration, even when combined with ranged or

temporal spells.

The cost of the spells in magic points is equal to the total points

of manipulation, counting the Multispell. The time need to cast the

spells is equal to the total points of manipulation used, multiplied by the number of spells being cast. This is the major

exception to the usual rule for time and cost of spellcasting.

Multispell is a Hard Magic skill.

Enchant

As per Enchant

Summon

As per Summon.

HIGH MAGIC

Spell Criticals

A critical success with a High Magic spell will typically have twice

the normal effect of the spell.

Spell Fumbles

The more powerful High Magic sorcery spells can be fumbled, possibly with

disastrous consequences.

SORCERY FUMBLE TABLE (Not quite done yet)





HIGH MAGIC

These are the true spells of sorcery. They are typically

taught to sorcerers of apprentice rank or higher, knights

and the nobility. Apprentices pay for their training in services

rendered, knights may have their spells paid for by their lord,

or may have to pay for them on their own. Other sorcerers must pay

for their training.

Each High Magic spell is learned and acquired as a Magic skill of

varying difficulty, typically Medium or Hard, although some are of

Very Hard difficulty.

HIGH MAGIC SPELLS

(This section will contain spells similar to most of the RQIII sorcery

spells, with some additions and some spells redefined. Certain spells are specific to certain schools of sorcery (Vadeli, Brithini, Hrestoli, etc.),

and certain schools of sorcery forbid the learning of certain spells

(typically Tap), and do not teach others (i.e., Immortality). Independent

sorcerers do not have access to school specific spells, but they can study

any other sorcery spells they can access).



Page 54:

ENCHANTING, various corrections:

Armoring Enchantment, p. 57 Correction:

Each point of POW adds 1d3 armor points, not 1d6.

Binding Enchantment, p. 57 Addition:

Each point of POW allows one to create an item that has

the potential to bind a creature with 20 points of a single

characteristic. To create a POW spirit binding enchantment

that can trap a POW spirit of POW 24 21 to 40 would

require a 2 POW enchantment.

Magic Point Matrix Enchantment, p. 57 Correction:

Each point of POW stores 1d10 magic points, not 1.

Spell Matrix Enchantment, p. 57 Clarification:

A spirit magic enchantment is needed to create a spirit

spell matrix. The divine enchantment is needed to create

a divine spell matrix. Sorcery is needed to create a sorcery

matrix.

Strengthening Enchantment, p.58 Correction:

Each point of POW adds 1d3+1 hit points to a specific hit

location, or 1 hit point to general hit points. (Not 1d6).

Ok. Do you know of anyone whose player characters use this enchantment?



RQIV GAMEMASTER BOOK





Page 24:

STANDARDS OF LIVING TABLE, replace sections with:

I L/day, 7 L/week, 56 L/season, 294 L/year

Status: Untrained labor, menials, prisoners, slaves, drafted

commmon soldiers, beggars, reclusese, etc. and their children.

2 L/day, 14 L/week, 112 L/season, 588 L/year

Status: Trained workers, peasants, poor crafter, soldier,

servant, poor tradesmen, etc.

4 L/day, 28 L/week, 224 L/season, 1176 L/year

Status: Average workers, landed peasants, crafter, trained

mercenaries, peddlars, sergeants, servants to those of moderate wealth,

captains of large boats, acolytes, assistant shamans, assistant

sorcerer, etc.



8 L/day, 56 L/week, 448 L/season, 2352 L/year

Status: Expert workers, lieutenants, captains of small ships,

average mercenaries, professionals, servants that command other

servants or have independent responsibilities, minor priests,

minor shamans, minor sorcerers, etc.

16 L/day, 112 L/week, 896 L/season, 4704 L/year

Status: Master workers, master crafters, merchants, traders,

expert mercenaries, knights, thanes, poor nobles, priests,

shamans, sorcerers.



32 L/day, 224 L/week, 1792 L/season, 9408 L/year

Status: Elite mercenaries, minor nobility, master merchants,

minor nobility, secretaries and factotums to nobility,

well off priests, powerful shaman, well off sorcerers.



64 L/day, 448 L/week, 3584 L/season, 18,816 L/year

Status: Counts, earls, nobility, important priests,

shamans with direct connections to rulers and other

powerful personalities, locally important sorcerers.

250 L/day, 1750 L/week, 14,000 L/season, 73,500 L/year

Status: Dukes, high priests, magi, great shamans

1000 L/day, 7000 L/week, 56,000 L/season, 294,000 L/year

Status: Archdukes, princes, archpriests



4000 L/day, 28,000 L/week, 224,000 L/season, 1,176,000 L/year

Status: King, queen, pontiff



16,000 L/day, 112,000 L/week, 896,000 L/season, 4,704,500 L/year

Status: Emperor, pharaoh, king of kings





Page 26:

PRICES, replace most of with the following:

Some base prices. The base price of an item is generally the price one can normally buy something at in an area where it is commonly available.

Nominal Value for Raw (unenchanted) Metals

Iron 700/ENC

Gold 600/ENC

Silver 50/ENC

Quicksilver 40/ENC

Aluminum 40/ENC

Tin 15/ENC

Bronze 7/ENC

Copper 5/ENC

Lead 1/ENC

In Glorantha Quicksilver and Aluminum are different forms of the same metal. When Tin and Copper are mixed in a 1:4 ratio, bronze is produced, but in Glorantha bronze can also be mined directly out of the ground.

Enchanted metals require the expenditure of 1 point of permanent POW per 10 ENC of metal. This will typically add a minimum of 150/ENC to the value of the metal (assuming it is unworked).

Worked metal is typically worth 1 to 10 times its raw ENC value, depending on the level of skill and length of time required to work it into its final form.

Minted coins are typically worth twice their raw ENC value.



Iron armor and weapons will typically be worth at least 20 times the value of an equivalent bronze item. A piece of crafted iron will generally not be worth less than 1000L/ENC of Iron.

5 bolgs = 1 Clack (C)

10 clacks = 1 Lunar (L) (also known as a Guilder)

20 Lunars = 1 Wheel (W)

Tools

Awl 1L

Wood Axe 15L

Hatchet 10L

Hammer 1L

Hoe 3L

Scythe 10L

Shovel 20L

1 hour candle 2C

1 hour torch 5C

Lantern 15L

1 liter lantern oil 2L

Traveler's Pack 30L

Back Pack 3L

3 meter pole 2L

10 meters rope 5L

Weapons

Ball and Chain 125L

Battleaxe 50L

Bastard Sword 125L

Bow, Composite 150L

Bow, Self 75L

Broadsword 60L

Club 2L

Crossbow, Arbalest 500L

Crossbow, Heavy 200L

Crossbow, Light 100L

Dagger 15L

Flail, Military 120L

Flail, 3 chain 120L

Gladius 40L

Great Hammer 100L

Great Sword 250L

Halberd 150L

Hand Axe 25L

Javelin 30L

Knife 5L

Lance 75L

Mace, Heavy 40L

Mace, Light 25L

Main Gauche 75L

Pike 50L

Pilum 75L

Poleaxe 125L

Rapier 75L

Rhompia 75L Quarterstaff 2L

Scimitar 60L

Sickle 30L

Sling 5L

Sling, Staff 10L

Spear, Short 15L

Spear, Long 20L

Throwing Axe 40L

Throwing Knife 40L

Prices above are for bronze or wood weapons.

Shields

Buckler 50L

Heater 25L

Hoplite 75L

Kite 60L

Target 75L

Round 60L

Armor

Soft Leather (1) 40L

Hard Leather (2) 60L

Cuirbouilli (3) 120L

Bezainted (4) 200L

Ringmail (4) 300L

Scale (5) 450L

Brigandine (5) 550L

Lamellar (6) 700L

Light Chainmail (6) 800L

Heavy Chainmail (7) 1600L

Light Platemail (7) 1800L

Heavy Platemail (8) 3600L

Field Plate (9) 8000L

Prices are for a full suit, SIZ 10-15. If SIZ is below 10, subtract 10% from price, if SIZ is 16 to 18, add 10% to price, if SIZ is 19 to 21, add 25% to price.

Greaves are 35% the cost of a full suit,

Vambraces are 20% the cost of a full suit,

Hauberks are 35% the cost of a full suit,

Helms are 10% the cost of a full suit.

Barding for a horse or similarly sized riding animal typically cost

5x the equivalent armor cost.

Saddles:

Light saddle 50L

Nomad's saddle 250L

Knight's saddle 500L

Animals:

Bull 800L

Cow 200L

Mule 250L

Horse, Riding 300L

Horse, Cavalry 1500L

Horse, War (untrained) 5000L

Horse, War (trained) 10000L

Slaves:

Average male

Average female

Average child

Skilled adult

Educated adult

Cost of food and drink

Poor 2C/day

Common 5C/day

Average 1L/day

Superior 2L/day

Excellent 4L/day

Noble 8L/day

Cost of Lodging

Poor 5C/day

Common 1L/day

Average 2L/day

Superior 6L/day

Excellent 12L/day

Noble 24L/day



Cost of labor:

Cost of unskilled labor 1L/day

Cost of trained labor 2L/day

Cost of skilled labor 4L/day Cost of expert labor 8L/day

Cost of a master craftsman 16L/day

If the work is dangerous or irregular, double the above amounts

(i.e. for mercenaries or part time help).

Cavalry or mounted messagers recieve twice the above amounts.

Leaders recieve twice the above amounts.

Weregeld:

Weregeld is typically worth 7 x annual income.

Ransoms range from 1x to 7x annual income.

Yearly income Weregeld

294L (poor) 2,058L

588L (struggling) 4,116L

1,176L (average) 8,232L

2,352L (expert) 16,464L

4,704L (master) 32,928L

9,408L (minor noble) 65,856L

etc.

Cost of 1 point of permanent POW:

1000L if no real skill is required (i.e. sacrificing for Divine Magic)

1500L if skill is required (i.e. a typical enchantment)

2000L if a great deal of skill is required (i.e. a complex enchantment).

Note, this is roughly equivalent to 1/10 the weregeld of an average man.

Good note. Cries out for the question/answer: can a ransom/weregeld be demanded in POW rather than lunars?

Cost of spirit magic casting:

1L/1 point

2L/2 points

4L/3 points

8L/4 points

16L/5 points

32L/6 points

64L/7 points

128L/8 points

etc.

These spell prices are half the listed amount if for a cult spirit magic spell cast for an initiate of the cult, and one quarter the listed amount if cast by a shaman for a member of his or her tribe. If cast by a shaman for a complete stranger, double the listed amount. If the shaman must discorporate to hunt for the spell first, quadruple the listed amount (i.e., at list price for a member of the tribe).

Cost of divine magic casting:

100L per point of spell for a reusable spell.

2000L per point of spell for a one-use spell.

Cost for one-use spell in line for complex enchantment. Consider cost for worked/POW sacrificed iron.

These prices are half the listed amount if cast for an initiate of the cult.



Cost of sorcery casting:

Base spell cost 1L

Per point of total manipulation:

1L/1 point

4L/2 points

9L/3 points

16L/4 points

25L/5 points

36L/6 points

49L/7 points

64L/8 points

81L/9 points

100L/10 points

121L/11 points

144L/12 points

169L/13 points

196L/14 points

225L/15 points

256L/16 points

289L/17 points

324L/18 points

686L/19 points

800L/20 points

etc.

The above prices are for High Magic.

Consider the above for a 20 point manipulation on the armoring enchantment/protection sorcery. 10 points of armor and 10 points of endurance/extension. Would you really buy armor when 800L got you a non-weight 10 pt armor outfit?

Halve the prices for Low Magic.

These prices would be for casting spells for a compete stranger.

Enchantments:

Enchantments will typically cost 1500L to 2000L/point of permanent POW expended, depending on the complexity of the enchantment.

Cost of summoning:

Typically twice the square of the magic points expended in the summoning, or in other words twice the amount on the sorcery table above. It costs twice the above amount if the spirit summoned is moderately dangerous (magic, passion or disease spirit), four times the above amount if the spirit summoned is exceptionally dangerous (ghost, wraith, elemental).

But of course, the sorcery prices fit well with supply and demand. Overall, good prices.

Magic items:

Matrices are typically worth 1500L/point.

Magic point storage crystals or matrices are typically worth 300L/point.

Powered crystals are typically worth 2000L-4000L/point.

Fixed truestone is typically worth 3000L/point.







Page 36:

NORMAL DAILY SAILING PROCEDURE,



Change the first paragraph of the page to read:

"...tegrity of the ship protected the cargo and crew despite the captain's incompetence and the ship suffers no loss. If the seaworthiness resistance roll falls reduce seaworthiness by one point."



At this point I would add, as an option, my modular skill system for determining complex actions and skill contests.

RQIV CREATURES BOOK

Page 10:

BRONTOSAUR, correction:

The tail lash should do 4D6 damage, not 7D6 damage.



Page 13:

CHONCHON, corrections:

Notes: After a successful Bite, it hangs on and Attacks in spirit combat every round. Each successful spirit combat Attack does 1D6 MP damage, regardless of the Chonchon's MP. It absorbs the MP its victim loses. The target can Defend against this Attack, but cannot Attack the chonchon in spirit combat.

Skills: add Spirit Combat 80 + 13.



Page 17:

ELEMENTALS, add to introduction:

Elementals are considered embodied spirits for the purposese of spirit combat. Their Spirit Combat skill is usually 25% plus magic bonus.

Page 21:

GHOST, correction and additions:

Ghosts have no STR but do have INT of 2D6+6.

Magic: A ghost may possess any type of magic, at the gamemaster's option. A shaman ghost may even have a fetch. (!?!) Ghosts may have unusual abilities or powers, ranging from Second Sight at will, the ability to demoralize opponents by its presence as might a ghoul,to special abilties in spirit combat

Skills: A ghost's Spirit Combat skill can be anywhere from base up to many hundreds of percentiles, depending on its age and activity level. Insane ghosts often make All-out Attacks. A ghost may retain a number of skills from its former life, particularly knowledge or language skills.

Page 34:

SKELETON, correction:

The first point of POW used in the ritual will animate a skeleton of up to SIZ 20, giving it the STR and DEX it had in its former life. Every additional 20 points of SIZ require another point of POW.

Page 35:

SPIRIT, additions:

A spirit's Spirit Combat skill is at least 25% plus bonus. An intelligent spirit's skill can be higher, with no limit to how high it can go. Spirits, after all, live on the spirit plane full time and engage in Spirit Combat often.

Unintelligent spirits lack Spirit Sense. Intelligent spirits usually have it at a level close to their level of Spirit Combat.

An intelligent spirit's Spirit Travel could be anywhere from base to over 100%. An intelligent spirit's Spirit Lore is likewise.

Intelligent spirits may also have other skills as well, typically knowledge or language skills.

Unintelligent spirits do not have Spirit Travel or Spirit Lore skill.

A Disease or Passion Spirit Attacks like any other kind of spirit.

A Spell Spirit's Spirit Combat skill is typically 25% plus 5% per point of the spell it knows.

Spirits in the Outer and Inner Regions of the spirit plane tend to have higher skills than those in the Frontier Region.

Spirits may have unusual abilities or powers, ranging from Second Sight or Visibility at will or unique magical powers to special abilties in spirit combat.

Page 39:

VAMPIRE, addition:

A vampire's Spirit Combat skill stays the same as in life, unless raised by experience. Its touch, however, drains MP on a simple MP v. MP roll, and the target cannot Defend against it.

Why not? Heck, I'd let characters fight Choncon's in Spirit Combat too.

Page 41:

WRAITH, additions:

A Wraith always makes a single All-out Attack, and always Attacks on SR 1 at a DEX of 20.

Skills: Its Spirit Combat skill is whatever it was in life, plus gains from experience. A typical Wraith has a skill of 60. If the Wraith's Attack succeeds, it does 1D6 HP damage to a random missile/spell location of the target. A Wraith attacking a helpless target (sleeping,unconcious, or incapacitated) drains points from the target's INT, STR, or CON, instead of doing damage. It gets the same effect when it succeeds in a critical attack on a target that is not helpless.

Page 43:

WYVERNS, correction:

The wyvern's sting injects poison with a POT equal to the creature's CON.



[End]



Return to Top of Page

Return to Topic Home Page

Return to Index

© 1996

Author's Home Page

Author's ../../../index.htm

<A href="mailto:ethesis@aol.com">Stephen R. Marsh</A>